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Importance
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Jay Mathews: Amid the SAT-obsessed, this family doesn't live by the numbers
by washingtonpost.com - Jay Mathews: Class Struggle
Feb 27, 2022
“The Demarees of Bethesda seem to be a normal American family, but wait. They didn't tell their children what their SAT scores were? They didn't do test prep? They didn't hire tutors? Could they have the answer to America's obsession with college admission?”
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Prepare your middle-schooler for college
by washingtonpost.com - Jay Mathews: Class Struggle
Jan 30, 2022
“Even in middle school, there are a few easy things (and some more challenging steps) students can do to up their chances at a college admission. Join Jay Mathews to discuss these tactics.”
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The SAT Will Go Completely Digital by 2024
by NYT > Education
Jan 26, 2022
“The SAT will go completely digital by 2024 amid questions about whether college admissions tests are fair, or even necessary.”
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Kareem Abdul-Jabbar reacts to John Stockton's anti-vaxx conspiracy
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Jan 25, 2022
“Following Gonzaga University's decision to suspend Utah Jazz hall-of-famer John Stockton's season tickets, fellow NBA icon Kareem Abdul-Jabbar says Stockton's untruthful Covid vaccine claims push a 'dumb jocks' stereotype for athletes.”
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Top Jan. 6 Investigator Fired From Post at the University of Virginia
by NYT > Education
Jan 24, 2022
“Democrats in Virginia denounced the action as a partisan move aimed at helping former President Donald J. Trump undercut the investigation of the Capitol riot.”
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Former President of Florida International University Explains Sudden Exit
by NYT > Education
Jan 24, 2022
“On Sunday, Mark B. Rosenberg said he created “discomfort for a valued employee.””
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Judge Issues Stinging Free Speech Ruling Against University of Florida
by NYT > Education
Jan 21, 2022
“While a lawsuit is being resolved, the university cannot bar professors from offering expert testimony in lawsuits against the state, the federal judge ruled.”
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Importance
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Lawsuit Says Faculty at a Top Arts School Preyed on Students for Decades
by NYT > Education
Jan 21, 2022
“Dozens of people who studied at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts during a period of more than 40 years say they were sexually, emotionally or physically abused there as minors.”
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Importance
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Nick Saban and other sports figures urge Manchin to help pass voting rights bill
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Jan 19, 2022
“University of Alabama football coach Nick Saban and other prominent sports figures with ties to West Virginia have penned a letter to Sen. Joe Manchin, urging the West Virginia Democrat to help his party pass voting rights legislation.”
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Virginia colleges roll back employee vaccine mandates after Youngkin order
by Local Education
Jan 19, 2022
“At least seven campuses in Virginia will no longer require faculty, staff and other employees to get vaccinated against the coronavirus.”
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University of Michigan Fires Its President Over Inappropriate Relationship
by NYT > Education
Jan 19, 2022
“Mark Schlissel’s contract was terminated immediately for interactions with a subordinate, the Board of Regents said.”
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Pro-Trump phony electors and 2024
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Jan 19, 2022
“As the January 6 House select committee continues to investigate the events surrounding the insurrection, there has been great interest in what is a typically overlooked, yet important component of the election process -- the presidential electors who vote in the Electoral College.”
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Importance
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University president fired for inappropriate relationship with university employee
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Jan 18, 2022
“The University of Michigan removed president Mark Schlissel from his position "effective immediately" following an anonymous complaint suggesting that he "may have been involved in an inappropriate relationship with a University employee," the university said Saturday.”
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Importance
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Professor Who Called Students ‘Vectors of Disease’ Is Suspended
by NYT > Education
Jan 16, 2022
“Barry Mehler of Ferris State University was put on paid leave after uploading the bizarre welcome video, but some of his peers said his rights of free expression were being curtailed.”
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Importance
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He transformed a small university in Maryland. Now Freeman Hrabowski is ready for his next act.
by Local Education
Jan 16, 2022
“Freeman Hrabowski, the longtime president of University of Maryland Baltimore County, is retiring at the end of the academic year. He is one of the longest-serving university presidents in the nation and among the most influential leaders in higher education.”
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Importance
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Some Colleges Loosen Rules for a Virus That Won’t Go Away
by NYT > Education
Jan 16, 2022
“There is talk about moving from ‘containment to management,’ with fewer restrictions as spring semester progresses.”
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Importance
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In Lawsuit, Yale and Other Elite Colleges Are Accused of Limiting Financial Aid
by NYT > Education
Jan 15, 2022
“The federal lawsuit against Yale, M.I.T. and other colleges is the latest legal action to question admissions practices.”
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Importance
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Do Colleges Deserve an Exemption From Antitrust Law?
by NYT > Education
Jan 14, 2022
“It has gotten harder to justify giving them special treatment.”
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College Enrollment Dropped Again in Fall 2021, Despite Vaccines
by NYT > Education
Jan 14, 2022
“Total undergraduate enrollment has dropped by about 1.2 million students since the fall of 2019, researchers say.”
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Importance
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Katy Perry drops new music video
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Jan 12, 2022
“Katy Perry and Alesso's new music video "When I'm Gone" premiered during the College Football Playoff National Championship, the first time ESPN launched a global music video during a live broadcast.”
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Importance
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Trump allies' fake Electoral College certificates offer fresh insights about plot to overturn Biden's victory
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Jan 12, 2022
“In the weeks after the 2020 election, then-President Donald Trump's allies sent fake certificates to the National Archives declaring that Trump won seven states that he actually lost. The documents had no impact on the outcome of the election, but they are yet another example of how Team Trump tried to subvert the Electoral College -- a key line of inquiry for the January 6 committee.”
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Importance
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Despite Omicron, Los Angeles Students Are Returning to Class
by NYT > Education
Jan 12, 2022
“All staff members and students, vaccinated or not, must be tested for the coronavirus before returning to public school campuses.”
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Importance
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'A price-fixing cartel': 16 top colleges sued for alleged violation of antitrust laws
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Jan 12, 2022
“Sixteen top US universities, including Duke, Vanderbilt and Northwestern, are being sued by five former students claiming those schools may be involved in antitrust violations in the way those institutions worked together in determining financial aid awards for students, according to the lawsuit filed in a US District Court in Illinois.”
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Importance
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In pictures: Alabama and Georgia play for national title
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Jan 11, 2022
“Familiar foes are meeting in tonight's championship game of the College Football Playoff.”
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In a medical first, a man with terminal heart disease gets a transplant of genetically modified pig heart
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Jan 11, 2022
“A 57-year-old Maryland man is doing well three days after receiving a genetically modified pig heart in a first-of-its-kind transplant surgery, University of Maryland Medicine said in a news release Monday.”
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Importance
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Alabama and Georgia will unite against 'common opponent' of Covid-19
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Jan 11, 2022
“It's one of the biggest rivalries in college football, but -- while their teams will duke it out on the field Monday night -- familiar faces from the University of Georgia and the University of Alabama will also unite against a "common opponent": Covid-19.”
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Importance
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I was relieved when my sons got mild Covid-19. Then I thought about this
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Jan 11, 2022
“Covid-19 continues its rampage across the US with the Omicron coronavirus variant spreading here, then there, then everywhere. Two months ago, the US had less than 100,000 new cases diagnosed each day; now the number is over 600,000, according to data from Johns Hopkins University, with no signs of slowing down.”
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Importance
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Opinion: I was relieved when my sons got mild Covid-19. Then I thought about this
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Jan 11, 2022
“Covid-19 continues its rampage across the US with the Omicron coronavirus variant spreading here, then there, then everywhere. Two months ago, the US had less than 100,000 new cases diagnosed each day; now the number is over 600,000, according to data from Johns Hopkins University, with no signs of slowing down.”
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Importance
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Watch Tuscaloosa and Athens mayor make friendly wager live on air
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Jan 11, 2022
“Tuscaloosa Mayor Walt Maddox and Athens Mayor Kelly Girtz have made a friendly wager ahead of the College Football National Championship game. The mayors have agreed to wear a hat of the opposing team if they lose and deliver a check to a charity of their community's choice.”
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Importance
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Why Biden's student loan relief efforts haven't yet reversed a DeVos decision on for-profit colleges
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Jan 10, 2022
“The Biden administration has pledged to make college more affordable. But it has chosen not to reinstate an Obama-era rule meant to prevent students from taking on too much debt to attend predatory for-profit colleges.”
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Importance
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Analysis: The NFL isn't as fair as college football when it comes to overtime. Here's why
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Jan 09, 2022
“There are few things more exciting to a sports fan than when a game goes into overtime -- which is why the rules for how to win in such an event are so hotly debated. ”
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Importance
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College offers far more than a career path
by washingtonpost.com - Jay Mathews: Class Struggle
Jan 01, 2022
“My favorite teacher, Patrick Welsh, wrote an intriguing essay for USA Today about what he considers an overabundance of high school students going on to college. The same sentiments were expressed in a well-phrased letter from Eugene Morgan of Wheaton, published on The Post's editorial page June 20.”
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Importance
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Scores affect college choice but not necessarily success
by washingtonpost.com - Jay Mathews: Class Struggle
Jan 01, 2022
“I wrote a story several years ago about great people who got terrible SAT scores. If you are wallowing in shame over your score in May, and quiver at the thought of taking the SAT again in October, consider the case of Bob Edgar, who got 730 out of a possible 1600. (That would be a 1100 or so on...”
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Importance
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Long papers in high school? Many college freshmen say they never had to do one.
by washingtonpost.com - Jay Mathews: Class Struggle
Jan 01, 2022
“Kate Simpson is a full-time English professor at the Middletown, Va., campus of Lord Fairfax Community College. She saw my column about Prince George's County history teacher Doris Burton lamenting the decline of research skills in high school, as changing state and local course requirements and ...”
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Importance
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International students’ holiday gift: A break spent in their dorms
by Local Education
Jan 01, 2022
“With the pandemic complicating international travel, some students were worried about where to stay when their campuses emptied out for winter break.”
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Importance
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House Democrats promise to raise $10 corporate minimum tax
by Breaking News Updates from Portland and Oregon
Jan 01, 2022
“House Majority Leader Dave Hunt, D-Gladstone. SALEM --The Oregon House Democrats unveiled their list of priorities for the 2009 Legislature on Monday. It includes a commitment to raising the state's $10 corporate minimum tax and help for college students. Majority...”
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Importance
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Facebook movie 'The Social Network' shows the folly of Ivy envy
by washingtonpost.com - Jay Mathews: Class Struggle
Jan 01, 2022
“This time of year, with high school seniors slogging through one college application after another and parents jittery about their children's futures, I often write columns explaining why it doesn't matter where they go to school.”
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Importance
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They Say Colleges Are Censorious. So They Are Starting a New One.
by NYT > Education
Jan 01, 2022
“The founders of the University of Austin say they want to defend intellectual dissent, and declare that something in higher education is fundamentally broken.”
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Importance
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The Supreme Court Tactic That Aims to Kill Affirmative Action
by NYT > Education
Jan 01, 2022
“A group suing Harvard and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has asked the court to hear the two cases together, hoping for a ruling that would apply across higher education.”
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Importance
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$3 million Maryland grant will tackle colleges’ leadership ‘caste system’
by Local Education
Jan 01, 2022
“Faculty from the University of Maryland at College Park, the University of Maryland Baltimore County and Morgan State University will use a $3 million grant to research ways to diversify campus leadership.”
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Importance
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Woman Stole Daughter’s Identity to Get Loans and Attend College, U.S. Says
by NYT > Education
Jan 01, 2022
“Laura Oglesby, 48, of Missouri, who pleaded guilty to intentionally providing false information to the Social Security Administration, lived as someone nearly half her age, the authorities said.”
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Importance
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Small Virginia university gets $75 million gift, a modern record for women’s colleges
by Local Education
Jan 01, 2022
“An anonymous alumna is donating the money to Hollins University to support scholarships and financial aid.”
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Importance
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Jim Malatras, SUNY Chancellor, to Resign After Disparaging Cuomo Victim
by NYT > Education
Jan 01, 2022
“Jim Malatras, the chancellor of the State University of New York, said he would resign after text messages showed he had belittled a woman who later accused Andrew Cuomo of sexual harassment.”
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Importance
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'National Champions' tackles the big-money world of college football through a dark lens
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Jan 01, 2022
“"National Champions" tackles the NCAA and its hypocrisy about "student-athletes," but in a movie that doesn't make it across the goal line. The message is still worth contemplating, but lacking a better vehicle to convey it, feels more deserving of analysis on sports pages than the entertainment space.”
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Importance
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A Student Was Murdered Near Columbia. What Should the University Do?
by NYT > Education
Jan 01, 2022
“The murder of a student adjacent to Columbia’s ever-expanding campus renews questions about the school’s obligations to the surrounding communities.”
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Importance
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The infectious disease expert who warned us 800,000 Americans would die of Covid-19
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Jan 01, 2022
“Michael Osterholm is director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota and author of The New York Times bestseller, "Deadliest Enemy: Our War Against Killer Germs." He has been publicly warning of the dangers of a global pandemic for more than a decade and half and was a member of Joe Biden's Covid task force during the presidential transition. In April 2020, he told me that he estimated that there could be 800,000 deaths from Covid-19 within 18 months in the US. That prediction has proven eerily prescient; a year and a half after Osterholm made that prediction more than 793,000 Americans have died from the disease. I spoke to Osterholm this week about what he sees ahead for the pandemic. Our conversation was edited for clarity.”
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Importance
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A partial skull bone and dozens of skeletal remains found in missing student's car discovered after almost 46 years
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Dec 10, 2021
“Investigators picking through Kyle Clinkscales' rusted 1974 Ford Pinto have recovered a partial skull bone, dozens of human remains and personal items believed to belong to the college student, who's been missing for almost 46 years, authorities announced on Thursday.”
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Importance
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‘Dickinson’ on AppleTV+ Is Ending. But the Props Live On in Archives.
by NYT > Education
Dec 10, 2021
“The Apple TV+ series “Dickinson” is donating scripts, props and other artifacts — including painstaking replicas of the poet’s manuscripts — to the Emily Dickinson Museum and Harvard University.”
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Importance
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Socially Distant Wrestling: Young Athletes ‘Robbed’ by Covid Rules
by NYT > Education
Dec 09, 2021
“High school teams with big ambitions are barred from playing in the state championships, possibly jeopardizing college scholarships.”
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Importance
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Protests after professor says men should be prioritized for fields such as law and medicine
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Dec 09, 2021
“Hundreds of protestors demonstrated at Boise State University in Idaho over the weekend following comments made at a conference by a professor who said men should be prioritized for fields of study such as engineering, medicine and law.”
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Importance
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Crime log: Spouse of staff member carjacked by male suspect
by The GW Hatchet
Jan 01, 2022
“Theft II/From Building
Mitchell Hall (7-Eleven)
9/20/2021 – 7:44 p.m.
Open Case
GW Police Department officers responded to a report of theft. Upon arrival, officers made contact with a female employee who said a male subject stole orange juice from the store.
– Case open.
Theft II/From Building
Duquès Hall
9/16/2021 – 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Open Case
Two male staff members reported basic tools, like wrenches and screwdrivers, stolen from their lockers.
– Case open.
Theft II/From Building
University Student Center
9/21/2021 – 2:25 p.m.
Open Case
A staff member reported her purse stolen after leaving it in the University Student Center restroom. The purse contained basic items like an ID, wallet and credit cards.
– Case open.
Theft II/From Building, Unlawful Entry
Mitchell Hall (7-Eleven)
9/21/2021 – 6:19 p.m.
Open Case
GWPD officers responded to a report of theft. Upon arrival, officers made contact with the complainant, who stated that a male subject who had previously been barred from campus had stolen multiple cell phone chargers.
– Case open.
Unlawful Entry
Mitchell Hall (7-Eleven)
9/21/2021 – 9:04 p.m.
Closed Case
GWPD officers responded to a report of a previously barred male subject entering the store after stealing cell phone chargers. Upon the officers’ arrival, the subject fled the scene and officers later apprehended and arrested him. EMeRG responded and transported the subject to the GW Hospital emergency room.
– Subject barred.
Theft II/From Motor Vehicle
2028 G Street/LLC (Garage)
9/22/2021 – 6:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Open Case
A staff member reported money stolen from his vehicle.
– Case open.
Armed Carjacking
Off Campus
9/22/2021 – 9:43 p.m.
Closed Case
An armed male subject carjacked the spouse of a staff member. Shortly thereafter, Metropolitan Police Department officers recovered the vehicle in Northeast.
– Referred to MPD.
Unlawful Entry
Science and Engineering Hall (Garage)
9/22/2021 – 11:48 p.m.
Closed Case
GWPD officers responded to a report of a female subject asleep in the garage. Upon arrival, they discovered that the subject had been previously barred from campus property. The subject was issued an updated bar notice and escorted off GW property.
– Subject barred.
– Compiled by Carly Neilson.”

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Importance
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SA textbook exchange program to alleviate costs: students
by The GW Hatchet
Jan 01, 2022
“Students said a centralized location for used and online textbooks could alleviate yearly expenses as the Student Association prepares to kickstart its online textbook exchange program.
The SA Senate voted last week to establish a textbook exchange program for students to buy or trade through Google Sheets, where users can view textbooks available for rent or purchase from other students. More than 10 students said the initiative could help them locate less expensive alternatives to textbooks instead of spending hundreds of dollars on new class materials each semester.
SA Sen. Gabriel Young, CCAS-U,  who sponsored the Hippo Community Library resolution  said the textbook exchange portal would help students connect with each other and either lend or sell their books after struggling to pay expensive textbook prices from markets like the GW Campus Store or Amazon. He said he hopes the Hippo Library could be available for students to use by the upcoming spring semester.
“There are some people who do not even have a job, or they’re using their work-study funds to just pay off for school,” Young said. “This will allow students to save money and put money back into students’ pockets.”
Young said members of the SA’s undergraduate education policy committee will post a Google Form link next month to the SA’s social media for students to submit their textbooks, post their selling points and share their contact information. SA members will then transfer the form’s data to a Google spreadsheet that all students can view and use to contact the person selling the book they hope to buy, he said.
Young said he drafted the resolution to address a few complaints he heard about textbook affordability in conversations with students during his office hours since last year. He said the financial aid office’s  website states that students – especially those in STEM programs like biology or neuroscience – may spend upwards of $1,400 per semester on textbooks and school supplies, which may not be affordable for the average student.
He said each box in the spreadsheet will state the associated class for each textbook, links to online PDFs and contact information for students willing to give away these textbooks. He said centralizing textbook resources will help students save time typically spent on finding required reading for class.
“I want this to be a resource that is continually updated so that students in the future will be able to use it, and it will be a good system for future academic people to use as well,” he said.
More than 10 students said the spreadsheet’s features, like information about used textbooks and free PDFs, could help them avoid costly textbook prices as they work to seek out more affordable ways to obtain class materials.
Sophomore Natalia Perez, an international affairs major, said she has searched through Reddit for free textbook links and asked her friends to borrow materials to avoid paying for costly textbook prices. She said even with financial assistance from her parents, paying high prices for textbooks that she’ll only use for six months is hard to justify.
She said the SA’s online community library will ease the process of finding free online textbook alternatives and pinpointing affordable options.
“Sometimes it’s hard to get them or it takes so much time to ship or they’re too expensive,” Perez said. “So trying to find cheaper alternatives is hard.”
Sophomore Sara Ragsdale, a philosophy major, said paying for textbooks forces her to make “difficult” budgeting decisions, like whether she can buy groceries. She said in addition to the community library, professors could assign more affordable materials and fewer textbooks to alleviate some of the costs, citing classes that require students to purchase almost 10 books in total.
‘“A lot of it is sort of the professors – I have two classes that require nine textbooks apiece, and that is absurd,” Ragsdale said.
Freshman Keely Busby, who is majoring in American studies, said they spent nearly $200 on textbooks for a single class this semester. They said they would like to see professors make required textbooks, specifically workbooks, more readily available online, through systems like the Hippo Community Library.
“If there’s a workbook, they can make that available to us through the campus website or University Student Center or the library,” Busby said.
Senior Lauren Lafond, a political science major, said she struggled to buy textbooks in the past because professors prefer newer editions, which are often more expensive than previous versions. She said purchasing used textbooks, which are often cheaper than new ones, can sometimes be a challenge if a professor requires an edition released more recently.
She said officials offering more textbooks for rent through Gelman Library would make them more accessible for students. She said the Hippo Community Library will not impact her much since she is a senior and it won’t go into effect until the spring, but it’s a great idea to alleviate textbook costs among students.
“It’s just something that you have to plan ahead of, and it’s challenging when professors don’t post syllabuses or things like that until right before school starts,” Lafond said. “So it’s definitely harder to get textbooks in advance and put aside money for them.””

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Importance
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GW should have been prepared for the surge in COVID tests
by The GW Hatchet
Jan 01, 2022
“Earlier this month the University announced that community members will need to get tested for the coronavirus every 15 days instead of once per month. Students who do not get tests in time will have their access restricted to some buildings and facilities – but a shortage of testing appointments left students waiting days to schedule an appointment or get results back. The University finally added testing appointments at the Foggy Bottom Campus – a change that was absolutely necessary – but the University should have been prepared to conduct more tests before announcing the new twice-monthly testing policy.
Frustration with testing delays was widespread , with students finding themselves unable to book an appointment for a week even when faced with serious situations like roommates showing severe COVID-19 symptoms. Some students with symptoms bought their own take-home tests at CVS Pharmacy, which can cost up to $125, because no tests were available. That is an absolutely unreasonable amount of money for students to have to spend because the University could not do its job. Some who did not decide to buy their own test had to wait five to six days to be able to find an available slot at the Foggy Bottom testing center.
Now, after a week of chaos, the University is expanding the number of asymptomatic testing appointments to 2,600 per day. With this new expansion in capacity, the facility can accommodate 75 people every 15 minutes. Officials are also adding a standby line for asymptomatic tests, where students can walk in and get tested on a first-come, first-served basis. The University is also accepting external PCR coronavirus tests, as long as they’re legitimate , and planning on increasing the availability of symptomatic tests at the Colonial Health Center, possibly expanding to operate on the weekends.
But the burden of managing these expanded asymptomatic tests is mainly on one testing center, the medical trailer in Lot 3. The University offers four testing centers but because 75 percent of undergraduate students live on campus, the medical trailer in Lot 3 and the Colonial Health Center are the main accessible testing centers for students and faculty members. Even so, the CHC only offers tests to symptomatic students and faculty, leaving the medical trailer to be the only available testing center for students without symptoms on Foggy Bottom.
The University should consider options like expanding testing centers to local medical centers in addition to accepting external PCR tests. Administrators should also explore ways of reimbursing those students who had to pay for their own coronavirus tests, because having to foot the bill for a test that costs up to $125 because of poor logistical planning by GW is unacceptable. Officials should cooperate with local hospitals to distribute a reasonable number of appointments at each testing center so students can not only can get tested, but also receive results back on time. The University should also consider granting conditional late exemptions for students whose appointment schedule collides with class time.
Students should also do their part and not ditch their appointments. No-shows are reported to be more than 100 per day – those are spaces that could have been filled by someone who needs a test. Students can cooperate with the University and medical staff by minimizing no-shows and following coronavirus safety protocols. With the expected increase in appointment availability in the CHC, symptomatic students must immediately get tested by booking with the students with coronavirus symptoms option.
The University is not experiencing a coronavirus crisis, but it does have a fair few cases – which is somewhat concerning. Although the cases have been decreasing since their peak on Sept. 8, with 45 positive cases on one day, cases have generally been ticking up since August. The University should have foreseen a need for more testing and built up the testing capacity accordingly before sending students scrambling. Now that the University has belatedly expanded testing, it needs to consider further steps like affiliating with non-GW testing centers or granting conditional exceptions. The last thing we want is another lockdown and return to virtual classes – and an outbreak that would send us back to that status could be exacerbated by students not being able to get tested if they have been exposed to the coronavirus. The University made a mistake and has taken the first steps to fix it. To prevent outbreaks on campus and a return to virtual instruction, it’s imperative that officials take every measure possible to ensure community members have adequate testing.
Yeji Chung, a Junior, majoring in political science, is an opinions writer.”

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Importance
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Student Court sets hearing for first-year senator case
by The GW Hatchet
Jan 01, 2022
“Updated: Sept. 28, 2021 at 10:26 a.m.
The Student Court will hear a challenge next month to Student Association Senate legislation establishing a fall referendum that could reinstate first-year senate seats, the court ordered Sunday.
The order schedules a hearing on Oct. 10 as part of proceedings for the SA Office of Legislator General’s lawsuit against SA Vice President Kate Carpenter, Sen. Cordelia Scales, SEAS-U and senate chairperson pro tempore, and Sen. Chris Pino, CCAS-U and the legislation’s sponsor. Justices unanimously denied two motions from Pino to dismiss the complaint and to seal part of his accompanying argument, saying Pino’s motion to dismiss indicated a misunderstanding of the SA’s governing documents and citing a need to maintain transparency with the student body in opposing his motion to seal.
“We find the Defendants’ arguments to be unavailing because they misunderstand the language of our governing documents and case law or otherwise highlight the nature of the issues precisely requiring review and adjudication by this Court,” the order reads.
The legislator general’s office  filed a complaint earlier this month seeking to prevent a referendum in which students would vote on whether the SA should bring first-year seats back to the senate after the positions were scrapped in a court ruling last November.
Pino, who motioned to dismiss the case last week, argued in his motion that the court lacks jurisdiction over the case because the student body has not yet voted to adopt any referenda as constitutional amendments. He argued that the court only has jurisdiction over “actions successfully taken” to amend the constitution, not those that may be taken in the future.
The court rejected this argument, stating that justices can rule on legislative action the senate has taken, including the special resolution to set a fall referendum.
“Defendants’ allusion to the need for acts to fall within some novel specialized action-dependent category of ‘constitutional actions’ for this Court to have jurisdiction have no textual, historical, legal or any other practical basis, and we therefore reject these arguments in their entirety,” the order states.
Pino contended that the legislator general office’s representation of the SA’s executive branch against its legislative branch breaks from the SA’s constitution, which he said mandates representation of the SA as a whole. Justices also rejected this argument, calling it a “live constitutional dispute” that the court should hear.
Justices also dismissed Pino’s motion to seal a portion of his motion for dismissal because students should not be “deprived” of information from the student government. Pino wrote in his motion that his reason for keeping that portion redacted was to protect the “identities and records” of the involved parties given his arguments’ “sensitive nature.”
The order states that sealing documents must be done “sparingly and judiciously” when considering the likelihood of harm to the parties involved and the circumstances of each case.
“To permit sealing otherwise would hamper students in making informed judgments regarding the competence and diligence of their student government – including this very Student Court – as it theoretically goes about faithfully representing their interests to the University administration and wider community,” the order reads.
The court  released the un-redacted version of Pino’s argument, which states that the legislator general’s office’s complaint attempts to advance a “frivolous” personal and political agenda at the request of SA President Brandon Hill. Pino alleges in the unsealed motion that Hill instructed the legislator general’s office to file a complaint against the referendum to block the senate’s push to implement first-year senate elections.
Pino said in the unsealed motion that Hill is using the judicial system to advance his policy agenda while “hiding” behind the legislator general’s office. He said Hill repeatedly argued against and threatened to veto first-year senator legislation in public and private meetings.
“This Complaint is step one of a bad-faith plan that seeks to autocratically undermine elections, the bedrock of democratic representation and aggrandize Executive power,” Pino said in the motion.
Hill originally said at the senate meeting earlier this month that he opposed holding the referendum and was prepared to seek the court’s opinion.
Hill did not return a request for comment.
Pino said in a statement that he agrees with the court’s decision to dismiss his motion to keep part of his argument sealed, and students have a right to access documents related to this case. He said he is “pleased” the court will determine the legality of Hill’s and the legislator general’s involvement in the complaint, and he hopes the court’s decision will allow for the return of first-year senators.
“I look forward to further court proceedings, where I will advance and substantiate the case for first-year representation as envisioned in the First-Year Senators Amendment Act,” Pino said.
The order states that the plaintiffs and defendants must submit briefs to the court by Sunday at 5 p.m., answering questions about the constitutionality of elections for first-year senators and the legislator general’s representation of the SA. “Any individual or organization” can also submit briefs to Chief Justice Yun-Da Tsai by Wednesday, Oct. 6 at 5 p.m. to participate in the oral argument, according to the order.
Assistant Legislator General Andrew Harding said members of the office “welcome” the court’s decision to reject Pino’s motions to dismiss the complaint and seal parts of his argument.
“We appreciate the court sharing our strongly held belief that students deserve a transparent government, while unanimously denouncing the defendants’ attempts to conceal arguments from the public,” Harding said in a statement.
Carpenter, the SA’s vice president, said she will not take an official stance on either side of the case, and she hopes the SA can still advocate for the student body despite the ongoing debate. She said the SA and student body must maintain transparency through the court case and outside of the judicial proceedings.
“It is our obligation to maintain an approachable governing body,” Carpenter said in a statement. “Therefore, we must inform all of the decisions we make.”
Scales, the senate chairperson pro tempore, did not return a request for comment.
The court also extended its injunction blocking the SA’s special elections committee from scheduling any fall referenda until the reading of the court’s final judgment. The court will live-stream arguments from the hearing on social media, according to the order.
This post has been updated to clarify the following:
This post has been updated to clarify that Pino supports the court’s decision to dismiss his motion to redact part of his argument.”

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Communication needed to convey FAFSA changes: experts
by The GW Hatchet
Jan 01, 2022
“After Congress expanded eligibility for the Free Application for Federal Student Aid last June, higher education experts said officials should launch an informational outreach campaign to prevent confusion over the changes.
Federal officials and higher education institutions will no longer consider questions on the FAFSA asking whether applicants have registered with the Selective Service – a federal database of those eligible to be drafted into military service – or if they have been convicted on drug-related charges. Half a dozen experts in higher education policy said the updates to FAFSA will increase access to higher education but may lead to more confusion for new students registering for aid since the required eligibility questions will still appear on the form.
The 2021 FAFSA Simplification Act – signed into law by then-President Donald Trump in December 2020 as part of the Consolidated Appropriations Act 2021 – mandated that the U.S. Department of Education decrease the number of questions on the FAFSA from 108 to 36 and expanded student eligibility for federal Pell Grants.
“Twenty million students and their families are in the middle of what is likely the strangest first semester of college in a century,” then-Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., a sponsor of the legislation, said in a statement last September. “Almost everything has changed for students, except for one thing – students still have to answer 108 questions on the dreaded FAFSA form.”
The form, which will open Friday, will still include the two eligibility questions because the legislation came “too late” for the FAFSA to be changed, according to an ED release . ED officials issued a letter to higher education leaders in June advising student aid offices to disregard applicants’ answers about drug-related convictions and Selective Service registration while the questions remain on the form.
University spokesperson Crystal Nosal did not return a request for a comment on the changes to the form this year.
Jackie Dioses, a sophomore majoring in political science, said she wishes GW communicated the FAFSA changes to the student body so she could better prepare to complete the form. She said she has to gather a lot of family financial information to complete the form, making accurately completing it particularly “confusing.”
“This is probably something that should be made a little more clear,” Dioses said. “They should just send a quick email to keep us informed.”
She said the University should offer more advising and logistical assistance to students filling out financial documents like the FAFSA given the complexity of the questions and the amount of personal financial information students need to provide.
The Office of Student Financial Assistance’s website posts GW’s financial aid policies , a glossary of financial terminology and a guide to financial literacy . But the office’s Financial Education Resource List, which outlines resources for students to gather and submit financial information, was not functional and displayed an internal error message as of Sunday.
“We should definitely have some financial counseling, at least for those who don’t know the most or need extra help,” Dioses said.
Annabelle Manzo, a sophomore majoring in women’s, gender and sexuality studies, said filling out the FAFSA is a “stressful experience” because officials do not offer enough support and financial literacy resources for students to complete the form.
“I am a first-generation college student, so that comes with a lot of anxiety around these sorts of things,” Manzo said. “There’s this fear of doing it wrong and then not being able to get aid, which is very important because we don’t have the finances for me to go to college without it.”
Experts in higher education said the changes made to the FAFSA helped separate a family’s financial and academic status from their student aid packages. But they said federal and university financial aid offices need to clarify, through announcements and individual communication, that students not registered with the Selective Service or who have had past drug-related convictions are still eligible for financial aid.
ED officials and experts said students with drug-related convictions and those not registered with the Selective Service may have been ineligible for financial aid in previous years.
Jill Desjean, a policy analyst at the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, said even though the questions shouldn’t affect application status, officials will still “flag” FAFSA applicants and flash an error message on their portal, stating they may be ineligible for aid with a drug conviction or without Selective Service registration.
“It’s reasonable to expect that some students could be confused,” Desjean said. “When they’re told one thing in one place and another thing in the other place, it’s hard to know which source of information you can trust.”
She said ED officials are planning an outreach program to email students who receive error messages regarding either of the two questions and requesting that students contact their financial aid office for guidance on the changes and how to move forward. Desjean said University officials should also individually reach out to students to clarify the process.
“They should be targeting the students whose student aid reports come with these flags on them,” she said. “They’re probably also including some kind of message that says, ‘You might have seen on your student aid report that you didn’t appear to be eligible. We’re happy to let you know that you are, in fact, eligible.’”
Tisa Silver Canady – the founder and president of the Maryland Center for Collegiate Wellness, a student financial aid professional and advocacy group – said eliminating questions from the FAFSA that are “not relevant” to a student’s financial position will help send more students to college with financial aid.
Canady said the FAFSA will likely have a greater effect on students who are applying for federal aid for the first time than students who are currently receiving federal financial aid – like Pell grants or Stafford loans – because those students have already demonstrated their eligibility.
“For students who are in the pipeline or thinking about going to school, this is something that could make things easier for them and also expand access to those who might have had that drug conviction,” Canady said.”

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SA finance committee should be more transparent
by The GW Hatchet
Jan 01, 2022
“Each year, the Student Association’s finance committee allocates about $1.6 million of SA fees to various student organizations. Without them, many student organizations and campus events – from the fall comedy show hosted by the Program Board to EMeRG, which provides free emergency medical services to GW students – could not operate. Unfortunately, the committee works largely under a veil of obscurity. In violation of the SA’s  bylaws requiring that “minutes, agendas, committee documents, and other materials” be made public and the repeated promises of SA leaders to increase transparency, students will search in vain for any documents that shed light on the decisions of the finance committee – or any committee for that matter. As a result, students have practically no insight into how and why their money is spent.
This is tragic in two senses. Not only does it deny students the transparency that they deserve, it also denies the SA the opportunity to showcase the efforts of its most impactful committee. With students back on campus and student organization activity warming back up, there is no better time for the SA, and specifically, the finance committee, to make good on its pledges of transparency and release the documents, like committee minutes, necessary for compliance with its bylaws.
The SA has reaffirmed its commitment to transparency for more than a decade , and for good reason. Transparency and responsibility are crucial traits in any government, student or otherwise. Particularly when dealing with the allocation of such a large amount of student money. But despite all these promises, the SA rarely, if ever, makes concrete steps to improve transparency, which is why you still can’t find publicly available committee documents.
The shift toward greater transparency should start with the finance committee. It is both the most important committee in terms of the everyday impact it has on the lives of students, and the committee with the most resources to create publicly readable and available committee minutes.
It is a shame it hasn’t happened yet because students deserve to know the process that granted $137,590 to the Student Bar Association in 2020 fiscal year, and another $101,535 to the Medical Center Student Council. These amounts dwarf nearly every other allocation. There are good procedural reasons for these allocations. They are two of six organizations that represent entire graduate schools, and the finance committee is obligated to give them 100 percent of the student association fees from the students of these schools. But I only know that because I was present when this was discussed. On its own, one may think it odd or even suspicious that .05 percent of the orgs are receiving 20 percent of the general allocations budget, and even on its own, this policy is not above criticism.
Technically, most of the committees are open to the public. But this alone is woefully insufficient to meet the burden of transparency. First, the finance committee meetings sometimes last more than four hours and can continue past midnight. Accordingly, most people can’t find the time to attend the finance committee meetings live, and require a readable account of the meeting. Second, the Zoom meeting links for the finance committee are not made publicly available, but rather, one must first email the chair of the committee to get a link. This wrongly places the burden of transparency on students and is more broadly indicative of a lack of effort and care in providing a sufficient level of transparency.
The reason why committee minutes, finance or otherwise, haven’t been released to the public likely doesn’t have anything to do with maleficent senators gleefully misappropriating 1.6 million dollars in student funds. Rather, it’s more out of embarrassment for how bad the committee minutes have been in prior years.
I joined the finance committee my freshman year because I thought I could help make the committee more transparent. But, committee aides lacked guidance, access to feedback, and sufficient manpower. Above all, we lacked a coherent procedure. Results were predictable. The minutes could hardly be deciphered by those who had not attended the meetings in person. These problems plagued virtually all other committees and had persisted for years, which is why you don’t see meeting minutes from any other committee either.
But by the second semester, we had learned enough to realize and fix these problems. We brought on another two aides, started recording the meetings, and developed an effective procedure. Within a relatively short period of time, we had thorough, readable and accessible committee minutes that could be released to the public. Then the pandemic hit and dashed those immediate aspirations, but there’s no reason this kind of effort can’t happen again, and there’s never been a better time.
We wanted to make these minutes public because although the meetings are frequently chaotic due to a generally loose enforcement of rules of order during discussion and voting, the committee itself asks questions, deliberates and makes decisions in a manner fitting for a committee with such an important responsibility.
But just because this was true when I was a finance committee aide doesn’t mean it will always be true. Students have a right to see the decision-making process of the finance committee and determine if they have stopped making good decisions. Perhaps of most concern to the SA itself, denying students transparency will only continue to eat away at student’s trust in the SA. We saw some of the results of this lack of trust when Justin Diamond ran in 2019 on the platform of abolishing the SA entirely and gained a full third of the student vote. The current trajectory of the SA will not dissuade more students from voting for someone like Diamond in the future.
I am asking the SA to stop breaking the existing transparency clauses within its bylaws. Specifically, bylaw 501 section 2, requiring SA minutes to be released to the public. That’s a necessary but insufficient step to rebuilding student trust. The road to transparency and student trust is long, and won’t be finished by the SA merely fulfilling its written obligations. But it’s a relatively easy first step. The SA has reason to be proud of the finance committee. It does good work. Let students in on that secret as well.
Sam Swinson, a junior majoring in political science, is an opinions writer.”

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SafeRide expansion exemplifies effective collaboration between SA and officials
by The GW Hatchet
Jan 01, 2022
“SafeRide is coming to the West End, DuPont Circle and the Lincoln Memorial. After advocacy from the Student Association, the program that offers rides for students to get across campus if they feel unsafe or unable to get home is expanding to three off-campus locations. The SA has been working with administrators for months on this expansion, and their efforts now mean that more students will have the option to call a ride if they find themselves feeling unsafe as they travel home. The policy exemplifies how the SA and administrators can collaborate on issues that impact students despite tensions between students and officials.
Students complained that SafeRide, previously known as 4-RIDE, had several issues that had little to do with the distance the service covered. Some had complained of unwelcoming drivers and long wait times, and one student had even reported unwanted romantic advances from a driver. In the reincarnation of 4-RIDE as SafeRide in 2019, the University updated the GW Rider app so that students could track each SafeRide vehicle. Previously, the app only showed the schedules of the Vern Express and Virginia Science and Technology Campus shuttles.
The new policy is a heartening step in the right direction. With the expansion of SafeRide into off-campus neighborhoods, students can feel safe knowing they have a reliable resource to get out of unsafe situations. Between social events, late-night Gelman Library study sessions or fitting errands into a busy college schedule, there are plenty of reasons why someone could find themself needing to get home late but feeling unsafe. If any of these everyday activities involves walking in dimly lit areas or being followed, then students who live both near and far from campus should have the option of a SafeRide.
GW’s campus and Foggy Bottom tend to be fairly safe places, but in the year 2019 there were still more than 1,000 crimes reported to GW Police Department, with nearly 50 of those reports being for stalking or sexual assault. Even still, the number of crimes does not account for people, especially women, feeling unsafe or threatened. This could be an even bigger consideration for people who live further from campus, including in the many apartment buildings in the West End or DuPont Circle. The long walk back home means more time in a less controlled and less familiar environment. Even if the overall risk of someone’s safety being violated is relatively low, it is still not zero, and people do not deserve to have to feel threatened making their way to or from campus.
But people will only use SafeRide if they know about it, and if its use is normalized as a legitimate and common option for staying safe. This is especially important given the tepid attitudes that students seem to have had about SafeRide and its predecessor 4-RIDE program. The University and the SA should widely publicize this change and highlight its benefits to ensure students know to take advantage of its benefits.
But students also have a responsibility to only use the service when necessary. Not wanting to walk home alone, feeling unsafe or being too intoxicated to make it home safely are examples of reasons to take SafeRide. But people should not be hailing a SafeRide car just because they don’t feel like walking halfway across campus for no other reason. If people frivolously use the expanded SafeRide for convenience rather than out of necessity, it will cause people who are hailing one of the cars for a legitimate safety reason to wait longer to get picked up, almost defeating the purpose of SafeRide. Officials have noted that SafeRide is currently understaffed due to a national driver shortage – GW should consider what options they have to bring on more drivers to ensure the service works in a timely way, so the onus is not just on students to keep wait times down.
The SA and administrators have been collaborating on the SafeRide expansion since the summer. Both the SA and the GW officials they worked with deserve credit – in a productive, non-antagonistic fashion, they worked together to deliver for the student body. SA Vice President Kate Carpenter deserves special praise here – she spearheaded the effort, and in helping to make this happen, is fulfilling a campaign pledge of hers to actualize small changes that make a substantial difference.
The relationship between the student body and administrators is generally a frosty, standoffish one. Most of the antipathy students hold toward officials broadly is well-founded, with many members of the community feeling like the issues they care about have not been addressed. Being able to make constructive criticism of the University, like the SA often does, while simultaneously working closely with individual administrators on specific issues seems like an incredibly productive and responsible approach to student advocacy that the SA is uniquely suited to undertake.
When endorsing SA candidates, including Carpenter, the Editorial Board noted the importance of delivering on campaign promises and working meaningfully with the University. In this case, Carpenter and the SA have done great work in that area. As a result of their constructive engagement with administrators, more students will have a way to get back to their residence halls or apartments safely if they are ever in a situation where they feel unsafe or in need of assistance. Not only is this a positive outcome for students, but it shows how the SA can and should continue to deliver for the GW community through productive dialogue with officials.
The editorial board consists of Hatchet staff members and operates separately from the newsroom. This week’s staff editorial was written by opinions editor Andrew Sugrue and contributing opinions editor Shreeya Aranake, based on discussions with culture editor Anna Boone, contributing sports editor Nuria Diaz, design editor Grace Miller, copy editor Jaden DiMauro and assistant copy editor Karina Ochoa Berkley.”

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Panelists talk teaching racial justice in public administration
by The GW Hatchet
Jan 01, 2022
“The Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration hosted an online webinar about teaching and discussing racial justice in public administration Thursday.
Professors from the University of Cincinnati and Hunter College said public administration officials could find inclusive ways to research and instruct on equity when addressing racial justice through more comprehensive teaching curriculum and reform to research standards. Andrea Headley, an assistant professor at the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University, and James Wright II, an assistant professor at the Askew School of Public Administration at Florida State University, moderated the event .
Tia Gaynor, an associate professor of political science at the University of Cincinnati, said professors should incorporate racial equity and justice in all conversations because of their impacts on the lives and jobs of scholars in fields like public administration. She said Ohio’s state legislature is currently drafting a bill to prevent the teaching of “divisive concepts” like critical race theory, racism and slavery – legislation that would jeopardize her job as a social justice educator and “gut” liberal arts education in Ohio, if passed.
“It’s critically important not only to explore these conversations but also situate racial justice and racial equity in all conversations,” she said.
Gaynor said faculty can teach about racial justice in the classroom through courses that allow students to dig deeper into issues of inequity while inspecting a diverse selection of materials and resources focused on of racial equity. She said incorporating conversations of racial equity into curriculum allows students to develop a better understanding of historical context and current events and how diverse spaces can broaden collective knowledge.
“We have a responsibility to help our students make the connections between what we’re teaching, what we want them to learn and what we’re seeing happening today in society,” Gaynor said.
Brandi Blessett, an associate professor of public administration at the University of Cincinnati, said exposing students to issues involving race and equity is essential because K-12 education has whitewashed the understanding of the history and the trajectory of the United States. She said teaching different ideas from multiple perspectives enables students to look at information differently.
“There are so many other people in so many other communities that have contributed to our society, to the makeup of our institutions and how we understand where we are today,” she said.
Blessett said because government bureaucracies are hierarchical, researchers need to start listening to community members whom they research from the bottom up instead of the top down in society. She said the people most directly tied to the issues would be best equipped to create strategies of success while working with individuals directly to understand daily challenges and build personal relationships.
“I think that it becomes really important for us to be mindful about how we, as researchers, arrive in these spaces claiming to do racial justice work or racial equity work,” she said.
Karina Moreno, a professor of urban policy and planning at Hunter College, said she observed how people struggled to respond as neutral to racial justice and equity issues when she worked with minority populations during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic. She said public administration is not an objective environment because communicating directly and intentionally with an individual does not allow for a neutral position.
“We live in an insidious world where we talk about race without ever saying race,” she said. “It’s like a code, and so I think there’s something very important about being deliberate and being purposeful.””

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Importance
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In President’s Lecture, author Naomi Klein urges boldness on climate change
by News Releases – Clark News Hub
Jan 01, 2022
“Naomi Klein did not mince words.
“Climate change is a crisis of narrative, a crisis of world view and a crisis of spirit,” the author and activist told the audience packed into Clark University ’s Atwood Hall, and another watching via livestream in Jefferson 320.
Klein delivered the Feb. 26 President’s Lecture , which kicked off the University’s second annual  Climate Change Teach-In  to be held March 23. The Teach-In is a campus-wide event exploring the climate crisis and possible responses to it through a series of panels, presentations and dialogues.
Klein began by recapping the recent Paris climate accord , which she described as a political breakthrough but a “concrete plan for disaster.” While the participating nations pledged to pursue efforts to limit worldwide temperature increase to 1.5 degrees Celsius, the hodgepodge of climate plans that were incorporated into the agreement actually added up to 3 to 4 degrees. The implicit message? “We know what we have to do and we’re willing to do roughly half that.”
Naomi Klein
During her talk, Klein wove in the history of her own interest in climate change. She said she’d always ceded climate matters to “green” groups, focusing instead on matters of economic inequality, social justice and human rights. But Hurricane Katrina, which devastated the largely minority population of New Orleans, revealed to her how deeply all these issues are intertwined with climate change. The storm was a collision of bad weather and neglected physical and government infrastructures, which set into stark relief a system marked by “institutionalized racism,” she said, noting that African-American residents were first abandoned, then later harassed. “I’m scared not just about things getting hotter, but about things getting meaner,” Klein said.
Klein described how crises are used by political and corporate elites to ram through policies that increase the divisions between the wealthy and poor. She cited California’s ongoing drought and wildfire challenges, which spurred the state to enlist thousands of convicts as front-line firefighters at a cost of $2 a day. When California was ordered to release thousands of inmates to ease prison overcrowding, the state objected, arguing that such a move would put the firefighting program at risk.
The policies of neoliberalism — privatization, deregulation, trickle-down economics, cuts to public programs — “clash at every level” with what needs to be done to address the climate change crisis, Klein said. Instead, the hard and costly work of reimagining our energy grids and investing in public transit goes undone, and corporate interests influence policy at every level. Klein pointed out that President Obama’s rejection of the Keystone XL pipeline has resulted in a $15 billion lawsuit against the United States government by a company claiming lost profits.
It’s important to connect the dots between climate change and prevailing social and economic ills, she said. The rise of movements like Black Lives Matter and Fight for $15 reflect “that people are refusing to be treated as disposable.” Klein said the popularity of presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders and Pope Francis can be partly attributed to people recognizing the failure of the neoliberal promise that “what is good for elites is good for everyone else.”
The stakes couldn’t be any higher, she said. Billions of people are directly impacted by climate change, with the harshest effects felt by the poor and powerless. She noted some African leaders have called a global temperature increase of more than 2 degrees a genocide, embracing the motto “1.5 to survive.”
Klein concluded her lecture with a discussion of The Leap Manifesto , a Canada-based initiative she founded with a coalition of groups who urge a move toward a just and sustainable economic model, one based in caregiving rather than extraction. The coalition worked with a team of economists to recommend ways to make the transition affordable, including ending fossil fuel subsidies, instituting a progressive carbon tax and cutting military spending. Other countries are now writing their own version of the Manifesto, Klein said.
“Small steps are not good enough,” she insisted. “Now is the time for boldness. Now is the time to leap.”
— Jim Keogh, Assistant VP of Marketing and Communications”

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4 years since Leap Day ‘launch,’ Clark’s LEEP efforts making lasting influence on learning
by News Releases – Clark News Hub
Jan 01, 2022
“On Leap Day in 2012, Clark University celebrated the official launch of its pioneering model for higher education known as LEEP  (Liberal Education and Effective Practice). Today, the first students to experience LEEP throughout their four years as “Clarkies” are preparing to graduate, making this February 29th seem an opportune time to share the progress, challenges and successes of Clark’s ambitious and innovative LEEP program.
Clark’s LEEP goals of fusing a liberal education with intense world, workplace and personal experiences has demanded deep, deliberate and creative change across the campus community. The decision to embark on this bold initiative was based on years of research in the learning sciences and emerging adulthood, guided by the essential learning outcomes of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U).
“LEEP reaffirms the hallmarks of a Clark education …  We are deepening and aligning the connections among all aspects of a Clark education through innovative curriculum initiatives, through creative new approaches to student advising and mentorship, and through impactful partnerships involving leading employers, faculty, students, staff, and alumni.” ~ President David Angel, commenting at the LEEP  launch event four years ago.
Clark continues to develop the LEEP model and innovative curricular and co-curricular programs designed to prepare students to lead meaningful lives. Here are some highlights:
Establishment of LEEP Projects , one of the University’s signature programs. In the last four years, 338 students have completed LEEP Projects; more than 100 faculty and staff have served as project mentors; and over 200 organizational hosts have sponsored our students.
Founding of the LEEP Center (comprising the offices of Academic Advising, Career Services, Community Engagement, Study Abroad, and the Writing Center). This year, the LEEP Center is on track to have held over 6,000 student appointments, assisting students with experience-building and preparations for life after Clark.
Development of a new form of holistic advising, supporting students in their personal and professional development. For the Class of 2015, the percentage of graduates who are employed full-time, employed part-time, participating in voluntary service, serving in the U.S. Armed Forces, or enrolled in a program of continuing education at 6 months post-graduation is 97 percent (based on a knowledge rate of 85 percent).
A new Alumni and Student Engagement Center is nearly completed and is expected to open in summer 2016. The new building will house the Clark’s LEEP Center, a space dedicated to furthering the University’s commitment to providing students with the supports and networks they need for success.
Development of new student programs, including the Clark Athletics Service Trips (CAST) and the Presidential LEEP Scholarships . CAST has supported three service trips for student-athletes, one to Guatemala and two to the Dominican Republic. In the past three years, nine Presidential LEEP Scholars have received full tuition scholarships.
Clark has begun implementing and sharing its innovative LEEP curricular framework , which has led to an invitation for Clark to participate in three national consortia of select colleges and universities – two organized by the AAC&U on integrative liberal learning and signature work , and one organized by the Aspen Institute .
Major grants for curricular and student support, from: Arthur Vining Davis, and the Bringing Theory to Practice program.
Last fall, Clark admitted its largest class on record, many of whom were drawn to apply because of the LEEP program and its philosophy.
Richard M. Freeland, ex-Commissioner of Higher Education for Massachusetts (2008 to 2015), former president of Northeastern University, and vice chair of the Clark Board of Trustees, said this about the University’s unique LEEP program:
“Clark is truly creating a new academic model that systematically links liberal learning to the world of practice at every single stage and in every dimension of the student experience. The University is doing this because its leaders believe that the enriched form of undergraduate learning that LEEP provides is what our country needs, and what our young people need, as we face the challenges of the 21 st century.
“LEEP places Clark in the forefront of a movement that is changing higher education and especially enriching the great tradition of liberal learning that has represented the pinnacle of college-level education in the United States since the founding of Harvard in 1636.”
Although this “LEEP Day” at Clark won’t involve a lively celebration in Tilton Hall (complete with balloons and capturing a photo gallery of leaping Clarkies ), the busy LEEP Center will mark the anniversary with cookies and refreshments, and the University will continue to apply, examine and expand LEEP’s lasting influence on student learning and success at Clark University and beyond.
 
 
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These are the things we do for love
by The Michigan Daily
Jan 01, 2022
“When I measure the distance from my apartment to his, it’s 66 miles. It’s an hour and five-minute drive for him, sometimes even more dependent on traffic. For me, it’s a bus ride to the Blake Transit Center, getting on the Michigan Flyer for an hour and a half, and then driving to his apartment. No matter the distance between the two of us, these are the things we do for love. 
I met my boyfriend online in December of freshman year. We met on Bumble (yes, a dating app). The beginning of our relationship was very exciting. I was at home in New York City and he was at home in East Lansing, so our “talking stage” was completely virtual, sharing memes and text messages. I remember texting him about my family, sharing our Christmas tradition of only eating pepper pot and bread on Christmas morning and him sharing his stepmother’s tradition of making Yorkshire pudding for Christmas Eve dinner. We would exchange pictures of our locations in time, me sending him pictures of art from the Whitney Museum of American Art in Manhattan and him sharing pictures of his cat Kiwi curled up on the beige cat house at his dad’s house. I was attentive to his text messages, taking in every sentence telling me about his family, cats and friends each day because that was the only form of communication we had. After a month of only communicating virtually, I was squealing with joy at the thought of meeting him in person. By the time we met in person that January, I felt as if I already knew him for ages. Sadly, we would only see each other on weekends, because while I was a first-year student in Ann Arbor, he was a junior at Michigan State University in East Lansing. 
Saturday mornings during my freshman year were a race against time. Being in a (somewhat) long-distance relationship makes time spent together very sacred. Every second, minute and hour spent with him brought me peace at the end of my hectic school week. Therefore, I was always trying to find the fastest way back to my dorm from work in order to get on the earliest bus to see him. During my walks back to the dorm on Saturday mornings, I would carefully break down my entire afternoon, assigning a task to each minute to ensure I caught the bus on time. “Shower at 1:00, makeup at 2:00, hair at 2:30, be out the door by 3:30” repeated in my head like a broken record to make sure I never missed a beat. For me, time with him was precious, something I could not afford to lose. 
This race against time and me came to a finish when the pandemic hit. After dating for only three months, we took a leap of faith and decided to move in together. Before moving in, I was nervous because we only knew each other for such a short amount of time, but were about to take a huge step forward in our relationship. “Are you sure you want to do this?” I’d ask him at least once a week. “I mean, if this is going to work, it’s better to find out now instead of later,” he would tell me. 
Living together had its own challenges: who was cooking dinner, who was cleaning the bathroom and who was taking out the trash were always debatable questions. As time went on, I slowly caught myself frying my onion and garlic and making curry for us. Eventually, I turned the stove on every other night. On the weekends, the scent of fresh laundry detergent would intoxicate my nose when I started the washing machine. Slowly, but surely, I was fulfilling the stereotypical duties of a housewife. 
He began to embody the role of a man of the house, spending all day at work and returning home only to answer more phone calls and finish projects. I spent the day making the bed, cleaning the room, making each meal and running the dishwasher. When sharing the dynamics of our relationship, my friends would roll their eyes and say, “He needs to pitch in more, you can’t be the only one doing everything.” At first, I did not have a problem with the role I embodied, but hearing their words made me notice just how much I was contributing to household chores. Eventually, I felt resentment build up inside of me. 
I remember calling my mom one day and expressing my frustration, telling her he “leaves his things all over the apartment” and “takes advantage of the things I do for him.” As an Indo-Caribbean woman, I grew up watching my mother do these same “chores” for my father while he was at work. She would make him chai in the morning, clean the house and make him fried okra and roti for dinner. When I asked her if she ever got tired of doing this for my dad, she would always say no and tell me she understood how hard my dad worked during the day. She used to say something that I never really understood: “These are the things we do for love.” She was quick to remind me that my significant other was working 14 hours a day for us and that when we weren’t living together he was constantly calling me, reassuring me whenever I had doubts in school and driving to Ann Arbor to spend the little hours of free time he did have with me. She expressed that it is not about who does more laundry or dishes or who makes dinner in the relationship, but about how we spend time together at the end of the day. Her perspective shocked me because I always assumed that as a stay-at-home mom, she was tired of taking care of the house for my dad and us as children. However, she said she was always willing to do these things if it meant that she and my dad could sit together for dinner at the end of the day and simply have a conversation.
Looking back at this internal conflict I had with myself, I now understand what my mother was saying when she said, “These are the things we do for love.” It is not about who does more for the other person in relationships, but the things we do for one another that makes our days easier. Now that school is back in person, my partner and I have returned to short-lived weekends and homes 66 miles from one another. On Fridays after class, like freshman year, I find myself rushing home to take a shower at 1:00, finish my makeup by 2:00, and have my hair done by 2:30 to be out of the door at 3:30. During our time living together, I used to think I was contributing more to the relationship by taking care of the chores in our home. However, I think of the hour and five-minute drives he used to take to come see me, the 14-hour days he would work to support us and the sleep he would sacrifice. Somewhere in the midst of it all, I have learned that it’s not about how far you travel, but where you meet each other in the middle. 
MiC Columnist Anchal Malh can be reached at anchalm@umich.edu .
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Dr. Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve discusses racial stigma in American courts at Ford School event
by The Michigan Daily
Jan 01, 2022
“Dr. Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve, an associate professor in the Department of Sociology at Brown University and an affiliated faculty with the American Bar Foundation in Chicago, spoke on how race has shaped criminal justice policy Tuesday at a Racial Foundations of Public Policy event hosted by the Ford School of Public Policy. Dr. Celeste Watkins-Hayes, the director of the Center for Racial Justice at the Public Policy School, hosted the event.
Gonzalez Van Cleve’s book, titled “Crook County: Racism and Injustice in America’s Largest Criminal Court,” won The American Sociological Association’s Distinguished Book Prize, which is the highest book honor in her discipline. Her research focuses on how race affects the experiences of participants in the criminal justice system. 
When asked by Watkins-Hayes why a sociological approach is important to understanding criminal justice policy, Gonzalez Van Cleve said sociology gives insights into the patterns of criminal justice abuse. 
“We saw the George Floyd murder , and in some cases, policymakers talk about this as a one-off phenomenon, that this is a bad apple trope,” Gonzalez Van Cleve said. “Institutions and cultures are bigger than one individual. If we see them as one individual, we see a tragedy that has happened as an outlier rather than a part of a pattern that in some ways indicates how policing occurs not just in one jurisdiction, but in multiple jurisdictions.”
Gonzalez Van Cleve said the criminal justice system should not be the first respondent to many issues, including addiction and mental health. She said many other institutions can help individuals suffering from those problems instead of prosecuting them right away. 
“When they hear the word criminal justice, they should start thinking, ‘What other institutions could have solved this, what other policies somewhere else could have solved this?’” Gonzalez Van Cleve said.
Gonzalez Van Cleve said she is a “dramaturgical sociologist” who thinks about the performative aspect of social life. She described border patrol officers “as putting on a performance” when they interact with immigrants.
“It is possible that immigration laws say that we need to round up people that are undocumented, and if they are not citizens they needed to be deported to their home countries,” Gonzalez Van Cleve said. “There’s probably a more neutral way that it is stated in the law. It does not say to rope people like they are cattle, and yet, those officers have images and cultural scripts about how to do this and to what type of people … I call those performances racial degradation, which is the signal to us that these people are different from us.”
Discussing what students should focus on when they want to help marginalized individuals, Gonzalez Van Cleve recommended a change in mentality by focusing on those in power and how they came to implement the harm they do today.
“Nobody wakes up and says, ‘I’m going to do harm today,’” Gonzalez Van Cleve said. “They want to serve justice, they want to serve their country, they want to protect people. The million-dollar question is how did they become co-opted to do that action and create such harm.” 
Watkins-Hayes brought up the importance of looking back in history and relating past events with the imagery we see in the media today. 
“I think the examples we’ve recently seen at the border of agents trying to round up Haitian migrants on horseback, and the images being very disturbing, and what that invokes for people with the links to slave patrol of the previous centuries,” Watkins-Hayes said. “That kind of criminalizing and way of surveillance and capturing people has a certain historical valence for people that in the present day add a whole nother level of significance for people when they see it on their tv screens.”
Relating her earlier years to her book “Crook County,” Gonzalez Van Cleve shared that when she was a student observing other prosecutors, she noticed the blatant use of racial slurs and derogatory language towards Black people. She then conducted a study that involved sending law students to courts to observe prosecutors, and observed that white students are often given better treatment than Black students. 
“How did this become rationalized?” Gonzalez Van Cleve said. “At the heart of the answer is that you have a segregation between who gets to determine justice and who gets to be held accountable to justice. You have mostly upper-class white people making decisions about the morality of people of color.”
Gonzalez Van Cleve also added that prosecutors often used racial tropes to make case processing more efficient. One of the major racial tropes is the mope trope, which is used in drug cases to describe the defendant as lazy and under-motivated, and therefore not competent enough to be a criminal. 
Another racial trope Gonzalez Van Cleve described is the monster trope, which is used in violent crimes where Black men are described as predatory monsters to white women. These tropes are seen as helping to justify the defendant’s actions, but in reality, they are humiliating and detrimental to how Black people are treated in the court, according to Gonzalez Van Cleve.
“Those two tropes became easy handles to justify not just processing cases quickly, but also to justify denying people rights and to abuse the general public,” Gonzalez Van Cleve said.
Relating racial stigma to other social issues, Gonzalez Van Cleve said race is embedded in the media and policy-making through the idea of deserving and undeserving.
“When we start to talk about deserving and undeserving, that’s the signal that you need to start thinking about the racial stigma being associated with those labels,” Gonzalez Van Cleve said.
Daily Staff Reporter Caroline Wang can be reached at wangca@umich.edu .
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CSG debates Assembly’s impact in supporting Ann Arbor’s early leasing ordinances and changes to UMich sexual misconduct policies
by The Michigan Daily
Jan 01, 2022
“The University of Michigan Central Student Government convened Tuesday night to discuss the status of the Ann Arbor City Council legal battle regarding early leasing ordinances. The Assembly also passed a resolution endorsing a faculty motion on the University’s sexual misconduct policy for the Oct. 4 Senate Assembly meeting.
The meeting began with a resolution titled “Continued Support for the Early Leasing Ordinance,” which condemns landlords who have signed onto a recent lawsuit against the City of Ann Arbor and asks them to be removed from the off-campus housing website Beyond the Diag .  
City Council passed changes to the Early Leasing Ordinance earlier this summer, requiring landlords to wait at least 150 days instead of the previous 70 days before beginning to show properties to new prospective tenants. The Washtenaw Area Apartment Association, a non-profit organization representing rental property owners, filed a lawsuit against the city Sept. 10 in an attempt to overturn the changes.
CSG Vice President Carla Voigt, an Engineering junior, began discussion around the resolution by highlighting the previous work CSG did in collaboration with the Graduate Employees’ Organization and LSA Student Government in support of the changes to the Early Leasing Ordinance. 
“A group of Ann Arbor landlords and leasing companies have banded together to sue the city for this,” Voigt said. “And essentially this resolution is continuing our support and is talking about the lawsuit and says that these companies should be removed from the ‘Beyond the Diag’ website.”
Voigt said the resolution asks for the University to include the leasing company or landlord on Beyond the Diag and to add a rating service to the website. Additionally, the resolution requests that any leasing companies which signed onto the lawsuit against the city be removed from Beyond the Diag.
LSA senior Elena Swirczek said she was concerned removing the companies from Beyond the Diag could impair the clarity of the website. 
“While I appreciate the sentiment of (removing companies), I am worried that that could possibly just create less transparency and students won’t know what is going on,” Swirczek said. “Especially those that aren’t particularly well-versed in the internal politics of Ann Arbor.”
Voigt then reiterated that she wanted the Assembly to advocate for this resolution and addressed the safety concerns of students using companies which have been removed from the website. She said they plan to talk to the director of Beyond the Diag about implementing these changes. 
“I feel like (the rental companies) should not be supported by the University while they’re being predatory,” Voigt said. 
The resolution was referred back to the Communications and Resolutions Committees for further discussion on supporting advocacy in diminishing housing inequity in Ann Arbor.  
At the meeting, the Assembly also approved a resolution to support a motion on making changes to the University’s sexual misconduct policy being brought forth by faculty during a Senate Assembly meeting this upcoming Monday.
The motion asks the University to adopt recommendations from the investigation into former provost Martin Philbert, who was removed from his role after multiple allegations of sexual misconduct. 
When a search committee of a faculty or staff member is required, the recommendations ask the University to obtain written certification from committee members saying that all known information about the case has been disclosed and to document decisions on disciplinary action. The recommendations also ask the Equity, Civil Rights and Title IX Office to reference any reports on prior allegations while investigating allegations against an individual. 
The motion also requests that the University form a committee made up of sexual misconduct survivors by Philbert as well as Robert Anderson , a former athletic doctor who has been alleged to have sexually abused hundreds between the 1960s and early 2000s; Walter Lasecki , who resigned in August due to sexual misconduct allegations; and Bruce Conforth , who also had several sexual misconduct allegations arise against him. This committee would create an additional set of policies to present to the Board of Regents.
LSA sophomore Karthik Pasupula, who is sponsoring the resolution, said a student approached him about bringing this resolution to the Assembly.
“(The student was) pursuing a faculty motion to propose recommendations to the changes and sexual misconduct policies that the University recently made,” Pasupula said. “(This is) because (the University wasn’t) centering on the right priorities, and they weren’t operating in the proper way.”
Pasupula said though he feels CSG should endorse the motion, they should not be the main organization advocating for the changes. 
“I just don’t want CSG to be the main driver behind it,” Pasupula said. “We should be in a stance where we’re supporting it, not where we are the main pushers.”
On this issue, Swirczek said she felt it was CSG’s responsibility to both endorse and encourage the resolution.  
“To me, (passing this resolution) seems like we’re making it clear to people in the administration that we are endorsing (the motion) and it is something that we care about,” Swirczek said.
Despite conflicting opinions, the Assembly passed this resolution. Daily Staff Reporter Brooke Halak can be reached at bhalak@umich.edu .
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Dingell announces legislation to hold colleges accountable for sexual misconduct
by The Michigan Daily
Jan 01, 2022
“U.S. Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-Mich., announced new legislation Tuesday that aims to hold universities accountable for pursuing investigations regarding allegations of sexual misconduct. 
The proposed Title IX Take Responsibility Act aims to increase schools’ accountability for sexual misconduct and prevent and correct the impacts of sexual assault at the university and state levels. The legislation comes after two universities in her district — the University of Michigan and Eastern Michigan University — came under fire for varying sexual assault and harassment cases. 
“For too long survivors of assault have suffered in silence, afraid to come forward for fear of retribution, attacks on their character, physical fear, or, quite frankly, lack of action,” Dingell said in a press release Tuesday. “Unfortunately, we see too much of it in Michigan, we see it across the country, and I’ve seen it in my own home.”
The act suggests that schools would be legally liable for failing to prevent or correct acts of sexual misconduct if the school is assumed to have had knowledge of the allegations. The bill would further enforce the “ reasonable care ” standard introduced by former Secretary of Education Betsy Devos. 
“This is trying to get universities, colleges, schools, to understand that when you’re hearing these rumors, they have (a) responsibility, even if no one’s filed charges, you’ve got to listen to these rumblings of a cultural problem on your campus,” Dingell told the Detroit Free Press in an interview. 
U.S. Rep. Jahana Hayes, D-Conn., is a co-sponsor of the bill. In the press release, Hayes said the impact of sexual violence has a ripple effect for survivors, including issues of physical and mental health as well as academic difficulties.
“One incident of sexual violence is one too many, and those that enable and perpetuate violence must be held accountable,” Hayes said. “This bill would ensure that the onus is on education institutions to take responsibility for campus culture and sufficiently prevent and respond to violence against students, faculty and staff.”
The University is facing criticism in response to new information about sexual assault allegations against former football team doctor Robert Anderson. Hundreds of former University students have alleged Anderson sexually assaulted them over decades, stretching back to his first years as a University doctor in the 1960s. An independent report by the law firm WilmerHale found that top-ranking University officials knew of Anderson’s abuse as early as 1975 and allowed him to stay employed until 2003. 
Eastern Michigan University is also facing 24 lawsuits claiming the university failed to handle sexual misconduct allegations when students reported them. Earlier this month, four women and one man joined the other plaintiffs in requesting the University address the repeated instances of sexual assault both on and near campus. 
Daily Staff Reporter Shannon Stocking can be reached at sstockin@umich.edu .
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Sudhanshu Kaushik speaks to UMich Indian American Student Association
by The Michigan Daily
Jan 01, 2022
“In partnership with the North American Association of Indian Students , the Trotter Multicultural Center hosted an in-person event on Tuesday night with Indian activist Sudhanshu Kaushik as the guest speaker and about 100 people in attendance. The Indian video streaming service ZEE5 sponsored the event, which featured Bollywood music and film. 
Kaushik is the executive director of NAAIS, a nonprofit organization aiming to uplift the social and economic well-being of Indian international students and Indian Americans residing in the United States. 
Kaushik said NAAIS partnered with ZEE5 to tour college campuses across the United States and network with Indian students. He said networking with this group is important given that Indians make up the second largest minority group of international students on college campuses. 
“Our goal is to ensure that we can educate and raise awareness about young Indians across the United States,” Kaushik said. “The biggest thing is that there’s a channel for creating communication and sharing stories.”
Kaushik said he believes it is important to understand how every Indian student’s university experience is different, specifically highlighting the perspectives of Indian international students, Indian graduate students and Indian-American students. Kaushik also said there needs to be more awareness of the recent rise in hate crimes against Indians.
“The scale at which (Indians) are at (universities) makes them more accessible to becoming targets and victims of hate crimes,” Kaushik said. “Going beyond that, there’s just so much fragmentation, and there’s not a cohesive unit. We’re trying to create awareness of them and connect them with their city with their local regional governance, state and federal level.” 
Additionally, Kaushik discussed how COVID-19 restrictions on international travel were a stressor for many international Indian students, some of whom lost their homes on campus as a result. 
“What COVID did was it showcased that there’s a disconnect — a disconnect between Indian students, and a disconnect between them and the administration,” Kaushik said. “Whether it’s the university, or whether it’s the city, state, or our national level. This organization was started in 2020, but the history of Indian students in America is substantially old and significant.” 
Rackham student Shaunak Puri, one of the presidents of University of Michigan’s Indian American Student Association , said in an interview with The Michigan Daily he hopes people get more involved with the university and national community of South Asians. He said IASA aims to work on building those connections nationally. 
“I think something that I have learned over the last couple of weeks, is that we as IASA, are this connection point to a much broader network of Indian organizations across the country in the Michigan area,” Puri said. “I think that what I would want our members to gain is that sense of being part of something bigger that this (event) sort of opens the door to.” 
LSA senior Jhanvi Garg, IASA’s other president, echoed the hope for more IASA club members at the University to get more involved in issues that pertain to Indians in the United States. 
“I think that this was a great event to highlight the power that Indian voices have,” Garg said. “I think a lot of times we get shoehorned into the minority mindset of ‘we’re just Indian, we can’t really make that much of an impact.’ I think it’s a great message to our members — and the Indian youth nationally — that you really can get involved in politics and policy if you want to and they definitely should exercise their rights.”  
Business senior Delna Sholapurwalla, board member of IASA, said in an interview with The Daily IASA considered the shift between virtual and in-person during the pandemic to help create engaging events for IASA members. 
“Last year, everything was over Zoom, so we really did our best to get membership engaged and tried to put on some high quality events,” Sholapurwalla said. “This year, it’s a lot more (of) trying to get people pumped (to be) in-person … and we’ve definitely noticed high engagements.”  
LSA sophomore Nidhee Reddy, a member of IASA, said she joined IASA and attended this event to get more involved with the University’s community of Indian students.
“I’ve always wanted to keep the sense of (community) that I had back home, (so)  I think it’s really important to stay connected with your culture,” Reddy said.
During his speech, Kaushik said he believes that while the perspectives of Indian students are often underrepresented, their stories and experiences are still important and worth telling.
“We’re trying to organize and effectively (channel) this huge energy of potential that we have with Indian Americans towards creating a larger, more significant community for them, but history matters,” Kaushik said. “I want you to know that your history matters … it’s the fact that you represent something more significant, something more larger that isn’t talked about, that isn’t spoken about overall for the South Asian community, but specifically for the Indians as well.”
Daily Staff Reporter Nirali Patel can be reached at nirpat@umich.edu.
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Preparing for the uncertain: LNYF adjusts to virtual practices
by Student Life
Jan 26, 2022
“Students perform the tinikling partner dance during the Lunar New Year Festival show in 2020. LNYF executive director Jessica Huang said the group usually has 1,700 audience members each year, but that it is still unclear whether this year’s show will take place in-person or have an audience. (Photo by Curran Neenan / Student Life)
The Lunar New Year of 2022 takes place next Tuesday, Feb. 1. Washington University’s Lunar New Year Festival (LNYF), one of the University’s cultural shows, generally performs close to this date. This year’s performance was scheduled for Feb. 11-12. Then the omicron variant spread, and school went virtual. Again.
With the majority of underclassmen not allowed back and rehearsal spaces closed, LNYF has had to change the way they prepare for the show. Executive Director Jessica Huang spoke about the group’s current plans, saying that right now, they are planning for every eventuality. 
“It’s just a lot of work to be planning for either outcome,” Huang said, referring to the possibilities of an in-person or virtual performance. “And it will be a pretty last minute switch, because I think we won’t be able to confirm this until like January 31.”
For now, LNYF acts are hosting Zoom practices. Still, this format works better for some acts than for others. Huang cited tinikling, a partner dance which involves an additional two people rhythmically clapping 10-foot-long bamboo sticks around the dancers’ feet, and the lion dance as acts that are having a hard time with virtual rehearsals. 
“These dance forms are very difficult if not almost impossible to do with Zoom practice, at least long-term,” she said. 
Of course, the Zoom practices are only for the short-term. The current plan is to return to in-person rehearsal once the University reopens the Danforth Campus and the underclassmen are allowed to return to their dorms, both of which are scheduled for this upcoming weekend. If this plan does not change, LNYF will go back to practicing as normal — in person — and performing on the Edison Theatre stage. The question still up in the air will be whether or not they are allowed an audience.
Huang said that for a typical year, LNYF sees around 1,700 audience members. That is a lot of people to fit into the Edison over the course of only three performances, but she says she is optimistic, trying to “focus on the process” rather than the performance itself.
“I think it would be very tough on ourselves to only focus on what the outcome looks like when we’ve been working on this show for… a year,” Huang said. “And no matter what the outcome looks like, I don’t think anyone can say that that hard work was for nothing.”
LNYF is not the only performance in this situation. Black Anthology, which was scheduled to perform over the first week of February, and Carnaval, which is scheduled for mid-March, were also hit hard by the virtual start to the semester. Black Anthology said they could not comment due to how much was still uncertain. 
All three groups have been in communication. Huang spoke about an email she and the other directors of LNYF received from the directors of Carnaval shortly after the University announced the campus closure, and said that inspired her to reach out to Black Anthology.
“That was very reassuring to see that cultural shows — so many people on campus are involved in these large cultural shows that we have, and they mean a lot to a lot of people, and [it’s reassuring] that a lot of people are in a similar situation as us and that we’re all just figuring it out together,” Huang said. 
If the University’s current plan remains in effect, Huang expects the public to see LNYF sometime in mid-February, though whether that is in the Edison or online remains to be seen.”

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Men’s basketball on 13-game win streak as women begin conference play with up-and-down start
by Student Life
Jan 26, 2022
“Freshman Hayden Doyle creates space against an NYU defender Friday. The Bears blew out the Violets, 97-61, in their biggest win of the season. (Photo by Curran Neenan / Student Life)
While spring semester classes have started online, Washington University winter sports have remained in action over the last few weeks, with the men’s and women’s basketball teams taking starkly different directions.
Men’s basketball undefeated in conference play, sits atop UAA after 13 straight wins
Men’s basketball has continued their complete domination on their home court this weekend with two wins against New York University and Brandeis, bringing the team to a 13-game win streak and a 14-1 record overall. WashU is undefeated in nine home games. 
The Bears started their weekend Friday with a 36-point win against the NYU Violets in a spectator-less Field House with a final score of 97-61. WashU scored first and never let their opponents catch up — five minutes into the game, they were leading 9-3, and their lead increased incrementally from there. Graduate student Jack Nolan, who has averaged 22.5 points per game, led the Bears with 29 points. Justin Hardy and freshman Hayden Doyle also played major minutes, scoring nine and eight points respectfully. The second half of the game saw nine reserves rotate in for the team, showcasing their depth on the bench. Head coach Pat Juckem has had to utilize that depth at various points in the season as players have been sidelined due to quarantine restrictions.  
Two days later, the Bears swept past Brandeis 67-53 to secure their second win of the weekend. Nolan led the team in scoring again, and over the course of the weekend did not miss a free throw, going 10-10 over both games. He has scored 30.4% of all the Bears’ points this season.  
The team’s defense has stood out all season; the Bears lead Division III in scoring defense with their opponents averaging 56.5 points per game. Recently, Doyle said that Juckem has made an emphasis on transition offense, making sure that the team is rebounding and taking advantage of layups during transitions. “It’s been our defense all year,” Doyle said. “We’ve all just bought into playing super hard, and it just speaks to how seriously we take every possession.”  
For a team whose competition was canceled last year, this season is a welcome chance to make a mark on WashU’s record books. “Every single day, we walk into the gym and realize that so many things had to go right for us just to get to this point in practice,” senior David Windley said.  “We’re lucky to be playing with the current environment — that alone feels like a mini miracle sometimes.” 
The Bears are currently ranked third in Division III with a win against the number two seed, Illinois Wesleyan. “People can say what they want to about us. But in my eyes, we have absolutely no reason not to be the favorites moving forward,” Hardy said. “That starts with winning a conference title.” WashU has nine conference matchups ahead of them and is the only team undefeated so far in UAA conference play. 
Women’s basketball is 9-3 since losing their first four games to open the season
After a slow start to their season, the Washington University women’s basketball team has started to find a rhythm as they finish out their third weekend of UAA matchups. A loss to No. 9 New York University and a win against Brandeis University over the weekend put the Bears at 3-2 in UAA play and 9-7 overall. 
Freshman Sabrina DelBello looks for a pass against NYU Friday. The Violets routed WashU, 85-68, though the Bears beat Brandeis Sunday. (Photo by Curran Neenan / Student Life)
Their four losses to open the season in November, three of which were decided by three points or less, showed flashes of talent but lacked consistency, as the Bears shot below 40% from the field in three of four losses. Since then, however, the team has turned a new page, going 9-3 and improving in nearly every statistical category. Sophomore guard Jessica Brooks said the team had to refocus after the tough start to change the course of their season. “I think we were just way more intentional about our offense and defense,” Brooks said. “It starts on defense. Our coaches always said that, so they really made sure we focused on defense, focus on turnovers and then the offensive game just kind of came together.”
Injuries and COVID-19 have played a role in recent weeks, as the Bears have had to adjust to positive tests, changing policies, and a depleted bench for many of their games. According to Brooks, two key contributors missed the Chicago game due to COVID-19 protocols, and the Emory and Rochester games saw the Bears with only eight healthy players. Still, the team has persevered. “I think it just goes back to how we all trust each other a lot more now,” Brooks said. “You can kind of count on anyone; it doesn’t have to just be like one specific person.”
[Read Senior Sports Editor Clara Richards’ full interview with Brooks]
Leading the offensive charge have been Brooks and junior forward Maya Arnott, who lead the team in points per game. Brooks in particular has been a revelation in her first season of action; the sophomore ranks second in qualified players in field goal percentage (48.9) and second in points per game (11.7), and she also leads the team in overall points. She demonstrated her prowess on the offensive end in WashU’s dramatic double-OT win over Chicago earlier this month, where she put up 32 points and eight rebounds on 12-19 shooting to propel the Bears past their rival 102-97. 
On Friday, WashU ran into an undefeated NYU team who dealt the Bears their first home loss of the season in an 85-68 affair. After battling early for the lead, NYU pulled away in the second quarter during a cold streak for the WashU offense and never looked back. Junior guard Molly Gannon’s team-leading 12 points were not enough, as the Bears suffered their second loss in UAA play. 
Sunday’s matchup against Brandeis ended the weekend on a positive note, however, as the Bears used a third-quarter scoring barrage to surge past the Judges 79-53. Gannon again led the team with 19 points, and senior Samantha Weaver led a dominant effort on the glass, out-rebounding Brandeis 48-20. 
Looking ahead, the Bears charge head-on into their UAA competition, with only conference matchups from now until the end of February. Key games to watch in that period will be a rematch with Emory University, who edged out a 60-56 win over WashU earlier this year, on Feb. 11; their second game against NYU, who remains undefeated in the UAA after five games, on Feb. 18; and the home finale against Chicago on Feb. 26.
More StudLife stories about Washington University’s basketball teams:
From chasing a championship to searching for closure: Men’s basketball’s final week, in the Bears’ own words, Part 1
Together, on and off the court: How WU’s married women’s basketball coaches make it work
Athlete of the Week: Sam Weaver dishes on building a team dynamic and leading a young team”

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Importance
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Five tips for surviving remote learning
by Student Life
Jan 25, 2022
“Remote learning can be challenging. You’re put under all of the stress of a college semester without the friends or campus life that usually come with it. While we all look forward to being back on campus soon, staying productive and engaged in the meantime is incredibly important because the first few weeks often set the tone for the rest of the semester. Here are five tips that will help you survive remote learning.
Find activities that give you a sense of accomplishment
You may find that your class schedule is poorly suited to remote learning. For example, all the time you set aside to get from place to place is now empty, and those who don’t live in the Central time zone might find that their lunch break is no longer a good time for lunch. You’re left with all sorts of awkward chunks of time that are too short to use for getting work done. Activities like puzzles can help with these situations. Puzzles don’t require more than a few minutes at a time, and in two weeks, you’ll have something to show for your work. Finding a good book to read or even streaming a new show you’ve been meaning to watch can serve the same purpose. The important thing is that you feel like you’ve achieved something.
Shake things up
Remote learning can get incredibly monotonous. When you’re sitting in front of a computer for hours every day, it is important to change things up from time to time. For example, you could sit outside for one of your classes each day or even move between a few different spots in your home. Make sure to get up and walk around for a few minutes after every class, and try to find ways to be social — perhaps by planning activities to do with your family or reaching out to friends. 
Cook your own meals
No matter your level of skill in the kitchen, cooking your own meals is a delicious way to pass the time and take full advantage of a home kitchen. Whether you’re a skilled chef or still mastering the microwave, learning to cook for yourself is a worthwhile and tasty endeavor. Once you return to dorm life, you won’t have as many opportunities to cook as you do at home, so make sure to take advantage while you can!
Even if you don’t typically dedicate time towards your physical fitness, it is imperative that you keep physically active during remote learning. While typical college life involves a fair amount of walking, you won’t have any built-in activity at all during the next two weeks. In addition to physical health benefits, exercise is also important for your mental health. Just getting outside and taking a walk around your neighborhood can make a huge difference and help you de-stress after class.
Don’t be too hard on yourself
Human beings are not meant to spend long periods of time in the same place with limited social interaction. Add in the stress of a college semester and you’ve got a recipe for disaster. You’re likely going to feel unproductive and disengaged during remote learning, no matter what. The important thing is that you don’t get upset with yourself because of it. Yes, your screen time is going to rise significantly. Yes, you’re going to find yourself spacing out during class. But you’re far from the only one struggling, and keeping realistic expectations for yourself will be critical for making it through the next week.”

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Importance
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Future or ‘farce’: A look at WU’s Consortium for Clean Coal Utilization
by Student Life
Jan 24, 2022
“Workers place the finishing touches on the space for Urbauer Hall’s lab-sized pressurized oxy-combustor in 2015. (Photo by Megan Magray / Student Life)
Washington University’s Consortium for Clean Coal Utilization (CCCU) describes itself as a research center on the cutting edge of climate solutions. However, the consortium’s support for the continued use of fossil fuels and its focus on carbon capture and sequestration have faced scrutiny as scientists and activists sound alarms about the urgency of addressing climate change.
Consortium leaders suggest that limiting emissions from coal power production is a key tool in the fight against climate change, while critics argue that carbon capture and other technologies distract from the need for a quicker transition away from fossil fuels.
Established in 2008, the CCCU focuses its research on carbon capture and sequestration, advocating for the use of fossil fuels alongside solar and wind power. The consortium receives funding from coal companies Ameren, Peabody and Arch Coal in addition to the federal government, but Director of the CCCU and Professor in Energy, Environmental and Chemical Engineering Richard Axelbaum says the University retains research decision-making power.
Recently the CCCU developed pressurized oxy-combustion technology that Axelbaum said is “one of the top contenders in the world” for carbon capture technology and effectively dealing with the unreliability of renewable sources. The research resulted in a $6 million project with the U.S. Department of Energy, Axelbaum said. 
However, anthropology professor Bret Gustafson referred to the CCCU as “a bit like a farce,” arguing that “corrupt coal industries” want to keep burning fossil fuels to maintain a militaristic economy and satisfy corporate interests. 
“It’s simply their way of using the University to improve the image of coal,” Gustafson said. “That’s a problem when the University starts participating in corporate propaganda.” 
Vice Chancellor for Marketing and Communications Julie Flory declined to comment on critiques of the consortium and Gustafson’s comments about the University. 
Axelbaum acknowledged fossil fuel companies’ self-interest in funding the consortium’s research but said their agendas do not affect the consortium’s decision-making. He added that the consortium’s eventual goal is to develop technologies that can attract more funding from the federal government instead.
“The decision-making is dictated by the University, but the funding comes from the companies, and for obvious reasons, they would like to see technologies develop that have a path forward for coal,” Axelbaum said. “What we’re doing with these funds [from fossil fuel companies] is leveraging them to be able to get government funding. So the real goal is not to utilize consortium funds, but to seed the opportunities so you can develop approaches to things that will lead to federal funding.”
Beyond the emission of carbon dioxide, Gustafson said that coal’s status as a toxic pollutant in every stage of its extraction, transportation and conversion to energy necessitates the end of its use. He described the phrase “clean coal” as a branding strategy of the coal industry to improve its public image and compared the expression to the “clean tobacco” propaganda of the tobacco industry.
“From the very moment that workers remove coal from the earth, it is dirty and it is toxic,” Gustafson said. “The use of the phrase ‘clean coal’ distorts the public understanding and distorts students’ understandings of what the research actually is.”
Axelbaum pushed back against critiques of the consortium, arguing that fossil fuels are necessary in order to continue raising the standard of living for a growing population.
“Fossil fuels have brought us life,” Axelbaum said. “It’s made us live longer and has brought our standard of living to where we’re living like kings and queens.”
Environmental groups have long raised concerns about the messaging surrounding carbon capture technology, especially as President Donald Trump often focused on the idea of “clean coal” during his administration . Critics cite that producing electricity through natural gas, solar, wind or nuclear plants is still far cleaner than coal plants that emit less carbon dioxide.
Axelbaum critiqued the idea of a transition to 100% renewable energy, arguing that continued fossil fuel use is necessary to stabilize energy supply given seasonal and daily variations of wind and solar power and that the closure of coal plants would eliminate the stability that fossil fuels provide.
Wind and solar sources of energy are both highly weather-dependent, leading some experts to deem them unreliable. California’s August 2020 blackouts were in part driven by the state’s reliance on wind and solar energy sources, highlighting the challenges of an unstable energy supply.
“In an effort to argue we don’t want fossil fuels, that one thing… that could help wind and solar be successful is being villainized and removed,” Axelbaum said.
While wind and solar are more susceptible to variation than fossil fuels, some natural gas powered-plants have also experienced weather-related shutdowns in recent years .
Israel Institute Teaching Fellow in Israeli and Environmental Studies Elai Rettig said that the advantages of coal make it a difficult resource to overlook. He described the CCCU’s work as a pragmatic way to use fossil fuels in a cleaner, more efficient manner.
“That’s where the carbon capture comes into place because we need to accept one truth, and it’s a truth that’s hard to settle: coal is fantastic,” Rettig said. “I t’s very safe. It’s very concentrated, and it’s very, very abundant.”
Still, Rettig said that, as the effects of carbon dioxide emissions outweigh the benefits of fossil fuels, coal consumption must be reduced. He said that fossil fuels should continue to act as a “support system” for renewable energy until storage capacity batteries become sufficient. 
“Even in the most ideal net zero emission scenario, we’re still using fossil fuels,” Rettig said, “but we’re doing it much more efficiently.”
Suzanne Loui, lecturer in environmental studies, further emphasized the importance of “keeping everything on the table” in order to find solutions that meet a variety of human needs.
“I don’t think we should stop looking at any of our energy technologies, I think we should get better at all of them,” Loui said. “Then we can gradually start improving our use of renewables and other non-carbon-emitting sources. But until we can do that, I think we have to keep exploring ways to improve what we already know how to do with even fossil fuels.”
However, Gustafson remained committed to achieving total renewable energy. He cited the Solutions Project at Stanford University as a roadmap to 100% renewable energy, arguing that there should be greater focus on implementing battery storage at scale rather than developing carbon capture technologies, which he emphasized have possible deadly effects.
Gustafson opposed plans where companies profit from the collection of carbon dioxide by selling it to oil and gas industries, which would in turn be used to force more oil and gas out from wells.
“The cheapest way to achieve energy security and reliability is with clean, renewable, local energy,” he said. “Anything they do to try to delay that? I see that as criminal. The planet doesn’t have time.”
Read more about the history of the CCCU and Washington University’s relationship to coal:
Some members of Green Action call for WU Clean Coal Consortium name change
Sit-in against Peabody coal ends after 16-day effort
New clean coal facility in Urbauer set to finish construction”

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Importance
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Basketball sophomore Jessica Brooks on a double-overtime win over Chicago, her gameday playlist and her TikTok feed
by Student Life
Jan 24, 2022
“Jessica Brooks is playing her first collegiate basketball season and already making an impact for the Bears. The sophomore has played in 14 games this season for the Bears, scoring 12.4 points per game and leading the team with 16 steals. She also knows how to show up for the team at the right time — Brooks scored 32 points in the double-overtime win against the University of Chicago earlier this month, going 5-5 in free throws. Brooks sat down with Student Life this week to chat about her first season with the Bears after a sidelined freshman year.
This interview has been edited slightly for length and clarity . 
Student Life : Talk to me first about selecting WashU. You grew up in St. Louis, not too far away. So what was your initial draw to the university?
Jessica Brooks: It’s funny — I always told my parents, “I’m going a plane ride away — you guys cannot see me on the weekends.” I didn’t want to be in St. Louis. And then my mom was like, just take a look at WashU — you never know. Coach [Randi] Henderson had reached out to me and we set up a meeting, and I loved her. And then I toured the campus and loved it. I applied ED1, committed early in my senior year and I love it. 
SL : And so do you see your parents often?
JB: I was at home last night for dinner. So all the time! 
SL : You’ve been waiting for this season for a while — you had all last year to think about it. So what was your focus last spring when there was no University Athletic Association play? 
JB: It was a lot of support from the other girls. They were like, “Our time is coming. We’ll get to play eventually.” That was a lot of our motivation over the summer — just that we didn’t get to play last year, so we had to come out ready to go this year. I think we just realized that we deserve this. We earned this — let’s just make the most of it. 
SL : This is a pretty young team — you have a big junior class, but also two classes who are in their first season for the Bears. What do you see as your role on the team?
JB: Coach talks a lot about roles and what each person can do and how that impacts the team in a positive way. But I think my role is just to bring a lot of energy and competitiveness to practice and not make it easy on anyone with defensive possessions.
SL : One of the most electrifying moments for me this season was the double overtime against Chicago. Any time we play Chicago it’s incredibly high stakes. So talk to me about having a huge day at the right time — you scored 32 points, which is insane.
JB: That was honestly better than Christmas, one of the highlights of my life. I think we all just came into it like, “Okay, we’re here — we need to set the tone for UAA.” We pictured it as that yes, our record was whatever non-conference, but in the UAA we were 0-0. We realized that these are the games we need. And I think we just came out really ready to go. It’s a huge win, because we’ve lost so many games by such few numbers. To get that tough, close game gave us a lot of momentum going into the rest of the UAA. Also, I’d never been in a game where we scored 100 points. That was awesome. Just celebrating with each other on the bus, back home and in the locker room, it was honestly a movie. I feel like it was a scene from High School Musical or something — it was awesome.
SL : Absolutely incredible. What have been the best traditions or just things that you’ve been able to do in person this fall?
JB: Traveling has been huge. We were on the road for our first four games, which was kind of tough, but it was also super fun to get to know people traveling with each other. We also sing some songs before the game, which is nice because it’s like I’m in on the tradition now. I’ve seen them do it, I’ve heard them do it, but now I get to be a part of that. 
SL : So to pump you up before the game, what will you be listening to then?
JB: Um, I listened to a lot of Pitbull. And then the song that I play right as we’re walking into the gym is “Feeling Good” by Michael Buble. 
SL : Michael Buble is definitely more than just a Christmas music guy. So talk to me a little bit about what you’re up to outside of basketball. What fills your time right now?
JB: Over Winter Break, I did a lot of reading. I read “They Both Die at the End” and “The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo”, and they were both really good — definitely recommend. I’m on my phone a lot and I watch TikToks. Other than that, I take a lot of naps and sometimes just drive around and listen to music.
SL : What’s on your TikTok feed right now? 
JB: Recently, I’ve been on travel TikTok because I want to leave so badly and go somewhere warm. So like, a lot of vacation spots. And then I recently got onto lifestyle home TikTok where people do cool organizations of their fridge and stuff like that. It’s amazing. 
SL : And among your friends, what do you think you’re best known for?
JB: I feel like I dance a lot, whether it’s hitting a random TikTok dance or something like that. A lot of times, I’ll just be dancing randomly, so I guess I’ll go with that! 
SL : Amazing. I have one last — and maybe most important — question that we’ve been asking everyone. Would you rather adopt a child every time you hear Bohemian Rhapsody or have fish for hands?
JB: This is so tough. I think adopt a child? I feel like I don’t hear that song very much. But I guess I don’t think about it when I hear it. So I don’t know. 
StudLife’s Athlete of the Week ‘Would You Rather Tracker?’: Bohemian Rhapsody: 4 – Fish: 1
Read other features from the StudLife sports section:
Three-time Paralympic champion Kendall Gretsch’s journey from Olin Library to Tokyo gold
Baseball sends Durbin and Loutos to Braves, Cardinals in historic draft day
From the neighborhoods of Tamale, Ghana, to Francis Olympic Field: The men’s soccer assistant coach’s journey to the top”

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Importance
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From boosters to testing: What you need to know as the semester starts up
by Student Life
Jan 19, 2022
“A kit containing two COVID-19 Antigen tests is unpacked. These kits were sent to all Washington University students for the purpose of entry testing. (Photo by Ted Moskal | Student Life)
From a more detailed explanation of Washington University’s lack of a booster requirement to an overview of the services available on campus during the first two weeks of class, here are answers to some of the most important questions facing the university community as the semester gets underway.
Why isn’t Washington University requiring booster shots, and could the shots be required in the future?
The University currently “strongly encourages” all community members who are eligible to get a booster shot, but has stopped short of adopting a direct requirement like many other peer institutions have done. The reasoning for this decision is detailed in the University’s Spring 2022 FAQ page, which reads, “At this time, we are relying on the members of our community to take personal responsibility for taking this step and do not feel that we need to have a mandate at this time.” 
At a Zoom town hall Wednesday afternoon, the executive director of the Habif Health and Wellness Center, Cheri LeBlanc, said eligible individuals should certainly get the booster. Yet she added that mandating the shot for the community was not as clear of a decision as when the University had mandated the initial COVID-19 shots last spring . “The incremental decrease in transmission on campus if the campus was mandated to boost is not nearly as potent as it was in the decrease in being immunized in the first place,” LeBlanc said, explaining that the University expected 70% to 75% of people to get the booster given a strong recommendation as opposed to 95% under a mandate. “When we looked at recommendations for the safety of our community, it was felt that the grounds for mandating the booster are weaker and are not outweighed by the need to respect individual and physical autonomy in this instance.”
In an effort to encourage students to get vaccinated, the University will host booster clinics at the Athletic Complex, starting Jan. 31, which will be available to all students, faculty and staff. Administrators also indicated that a booster mandate could potentially be adopted in the future, depending on how the semester progresses. 
 
What services will be available on campus during this two week period?
Most of the campus services that the University offers will still be scaled back, but still available for the first two weeks of the semester. 
Olin Library will continue its winter break hours of 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekdays during this period. Starting Jan. 18, the public desktop computers and some study rooms are available to all visitors. The shortened hours will continue at least through Jan. 29, at which point the University expects to return to previously announced spring hours .
The Sumers Recreation Center will also be open with limited hours during the first two weeks. On weekdays, students can access the facility 7 a.m. to 9 a.m., 11 am. to 2 p.m., and 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. On weekends, the center will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The South 40 Fitness Center will be closed during these two weeks, but will reopen when in-person classes resume Jan. 29. Club sports will also not take place during the first two weeks, but are scheduled to resume Jan. 31. 
Dining options at the University will mostly be centered around the Bear’s Den and the Village during this two week period. The BD grill will be open 7:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. every day, while the Village grill will be open 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Other options at these locations will be available at relatively similar hours to their normal operations. However, the DUC will be less active during this period, with Ibby’s and Café Bergson as the only available options. 
 
What accommodations will be made for students who need to attend class virtually?
Because the pandemic may prevent more students from attending class in-person, faculty are required to accommodate these students in different ways, depending on course format. Last fall’s policy that lecture classes must be recorded and made available to students will continue. However, for non-lecture courses such as labs, studios and discussion seminars, accommodations are more of a gray area. In a statement to Student Life, Vice Provost for Educational Initiatives Jen Smith wrote that professors will be required “to accommodate absences in ways that do not penalize students and enable them to accomplish course learning goals for the classes they miss.” However, professors are not required to provide a synchronous virtual option for participation. Unless students fail their self-screening, or are asked by the University to isolate or quarantine, they are expected to attend class in-person.
 
Will there be any changes to this semester’s schedule along the lines of last spring, when the University canceled spring break and replaced it with wellness days?
Other than the two weeks of virtual classes, this semester will be structured normally. Spring break is still on for the second week in March, and there are no scheduled wellness days. Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Anna Gonzalez told Student Life that the University does “not have any reason to expect that we will need to extend remote instruction,” so virtual instruction will almost certainly be capped at two weeks. According to SU President Ranen Miao, Campus Life and the Social Programming Board still plan on hosting WILD, Trending Topics and other campus-wide events, barring “major COVID developments.” 
 
Will academic deadlines and policies look any different this spring?
One major deadline adjustment is the add/drop deadline, which has been pushed back from Jan. 27 to Feb. 4 at 9 p.m. in order to allow students to experience their classes in-person before making final decisions about which ones to take. New policies mandating accommodations for students who miss class due to religious holidays and barring professors from making major assignments due the day after breaks will also take effect this semester. 
 
What will WashU’s testing plan look like? Will mandatory surveillance testing ever be brought back?
Washington University will require all students to complete pre-arrival testing before returning to campus, using a free kit scheduled to arrive by mail at students’ residences between Jan. 17 and 21. Students who do not live in St. Louis are required to complete their tests and upload the results no more than 48 hours before their return to campus. Students who live in St. Louis should complete their tests between Jan. 28 and 30.
After this round of entry testing, the University plans to return to its previous plan of providing free diagnostic testing for students, faculty and staff. Community members who have medical or religious exemptions to vaccination will be required to undergo regular surveillance testing, but the University does not plan to mandate surveillance testing for anyone who is vaccinated. 
 
What will quarantine and isolation requirements look like this semester?
Students who have not been vaccinated or are vaccinated and eligible but not yet boosted will be required to quarantine for five days if they are exposed to someone who tests positive, while boosted students will not have to quarantine in University housing for five days if they are exposed. Post-exposure tests on day five will be required for students who live in double rooms, LeBlanc said in the webinar Wednesday. Students on campus who test positive for the virus will have to isolate for at least seven days, two more than the CDC guidelines, which recommend five days of isolation. “Our physicians were pretty clear that they were not as comfortable with having our folks go back to double rooms and be back in dining halls just five days after they had been diagnosed with COVID,” LeBlanc said.
 
What does WashU’s capacity look like for students who need to isolate and quarantine?
According to Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Anna Gonzalez, the University has doubled its capacity for quarantine and isolation housing. Gonzalez said that the University had never experienced a shortage of quarantine or isolation housing in the past, but cited an “abundance of caution” in making this decision. 
 
Annabel Shen contributed reporting for this story”

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Importance
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WashU, you failed your students and the greater St. Louis community in “The Story That Never Ends” vandalization incident
by Student Life
Jan 19, 2022
“The defacement of “The Story That Never Ends” mural in the South 40 Underpass, a painting that depicted prominent African-American figures such as John Lewis, Chadwick Boseman and George Poage , was a tragedy. Over a year and a half since George Floyd’s dying words of “I can’t breathe” became a rallying cry for systemic change regarding this country’s — and the greater global community’s — treatment of Black people, we are reminded yet again that the societal cancer that is white supremacy never went away. But at a university whose mission statement’s goals include “welcoming students, faculty and staff from all backgrounds to create an inclusive, equitable community” and “ contribut[ing] positively to our home community of St. Louis,” how did this happen? How did a white supremacist group infiltrate our campus and vandalize the faces of Black icons who, in many ways, paved the way for some of us to be on that campus today? WashU, you have failed both your students and the greater St. Louis community in your inability to meet your own mission statement’s goals. At a time when both of these communities need you the most in our continuing fight against the COVID-19 virus and the virus that is racism, you have failed to step up and be the leader you proclaim you are. 
Earlier this semester, an incident took place on the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attack that saw an individual attempt to protest America’s War on Terror through flag removal. While the individual was disciplined (through sanctions that I believe went too far), Muslim students on campus were left to fend for their safety as a series of online hate speech and both verbal and physical harassment toward the individual prompted many to skip classes in fear of physical assault and discrimination. Is this what you call “ welcoming students, faculty and staff from all backgrounds to create an inclusive, equitable community,” WashU? At a time where you had the choice to both honor the lives lost on the tragic day that is September 11 and vehemently denounce Islamophobia on our campus, you chose to stay silent on the latter, Chancellor Martin. But now you and the University’s leadership are “shocked and saddened by this hateful act on our campus”? You emboldened this incident! The Patriot Front and their white supremacist agenda didn’t infiltrate South 40 on Dec. 18; they’ve been enabled to invade our home since September when you decided that your students were overreacting when they begged for protection against racism and discrimination. Your condemnation of the individual who protested the planting of the flags brought great national press coverage to our College Republican friends, but I only wish the same could be true for those of us reminded yet again, through this defacement incident, that American college institutions have never been welcoming to us. This much was clear when your inaction, Chancellor Martin, left WashU College Republicans with no obligation to the safety of their fellow Black, brown and Muslim students in their chase for Fox News and national media spotlight.
Our school is called Washington University in St. Louis, but from the looks of it, we are not living up to that name. And at this point, I might as well stop correcting people that we are not based in Washington state or Washington D.C., because we don’t deserve this beautiful place. St. Louis is a city that is about 45% African-American. Home to the Gateway Arch, the St. Louis Cardinals and Forest Park, this city of ours has a lot to offer. But despite its richness in culture and opportunities, St. Louis is still haunted by America’s favorite pastime: racism. Let’s not forget: the 2014 death of Michael Brown Jr. that sparked national outrage took place in our backyard. Ferguson, Missouri is only a 16-minute drive from the Danforth campus. The Old Court House resides in St. Louis. And may I not be the first to remind you, WashU, that this is the place where the case of Dred Scott v. Sandford was heard, arguably the most heinous Supreme Court case ever in the U.S. As a Black student attending WashU, it is still so mind-blowing to me that the place where the case that ultimately decided that people with my skin color were not entitled to citizenship, as they were no more than three-fifths of a person, was first heard only a few miles from where I study. And may I not be the first to remind you again, WashU, that the Old Court House was also once home to slave auctions that saw the humanity of Negroes violated and sold as a property. 
In 2015, Harvard Professor Walter Johnson wrote an article for The Atlantic titled “Ferguson Fortune 500 Company.” Known for his book “The Broken Heart of America: St. Louis and the Violent History of the United States,” Professor Johnson shined light on the fact that Emerson Electric is a multinational company that makes billions of dollars every business year. But despite that fact, they paid only $68,000 in property taxes in 2014 to Ferguson, a city that is 67% Black . Ironically, WashU, you are in that boat as well. On her campus visit in early November, Mayor Jones called on us to do better for St. Louis through a payments in lieu of taxes (PILOTs) program. We could use the money we generate from such a program to assist University City, more specifically its school district — which has a majority Black body enrollment of 89% — with educational developments. While your WashU Pledge was a great move for the future of this University, Chancellor Martin, education doesn’t begin when we enter WashU. 
St. Louis — to be more specific, University City — is also home to the Delmar Divide . Considering that the Delmar Loop hosts many of your students’ dining and night-out interests, WashU, you have an obligation to tackle this 21st-century racial segregation line that is in our literal backyard. There’s no other way to put it: The Delmar Divide is another manifestation of the white supremacy structure that we saw plague our campus on Dec. 18. WashU, if you are truly opposed to such a structure, develop a PILOT program to stop this racial cancer from spreading into University City further than it already has. Simply put: Denouncing white supremacy doesn’t begin nor does it end with your opposition to the mural vandalization. Paying PILOT taxes is one way to begin chemotherapy for this cancer, but from the looks of it, you love your 501(c)(3) privilege too much to do more to support your community. I ask you again, is this what you call “ contributing positively to our home community of St. Louis”? 
Chancellor Martin, my greatest disappointment is that often, when my friends and I venture into the city, our association with WashU is met by despondency by St. Louis locals rather than a warm welcome. This university has built a culture that is so obsessed with catching up to the likes of Harvard, Princeton and Yale that it has forgotten what’s important: our home and the people that reside in it. This toxic culture is even spreading to your students. I cannot tell you how many times this past semester I’ve heard my peers state how they secretly hate St. Louis, as it is a crime-infested city, and how there’s nothing to do here. 
WashU, “welcoming students, faculty and staff from all backgrounds to create an inclusive, equitable community” and “ contribut[ing] positively to our home community of St. Louis” are great goals, but act on them! Like many of my friends, I am frustrated and angry about your failure to do so in the vandalization incident. But make no mistake — in writing this, I do not entirely seek condemnation of your failure to act on your guiding principles, WashU. I also seek allyship and cooperation during a time when the entire WashU community and the greater St. Louis community need to come together and rightfully denounce white supremacy. People are angry and demanding justice; they’ve been protesting all semester for you, WashU, to do something. 
But they do all of this because they love WashU. The great James Baldwin once said, “I love America more than any other country in the world and, exactly for this reason, I insist on the right to criticize her perpetually.” And for many of us, that is the reasoning behind our anger, protests and calls for action. We love WashU, and for this reason, we insist on the right to shape her into the university we know she’s capable of becoming: a university that is committed to its mission statement goals, and realizes that without St. Louis, there’s no WashU. Chancellor Martin, my friends and I want to integrate ourselves with St. Louis because, for some of us, this city holds the key to our academic and career-related successes here at WashU and beyond. But this city’s dark history of racism, white supremacy and segregation –– a history you’ve helped shape, WashU –– is simply too great and painful for you to continue disregarding your own mission statement goals. But regardless of your inability to carry out those goals, we will stand up against this hatred toward our community, we will stand up against St. Louis’ dark racial past and we will fight. Because if the lives of John Lewis, Chadwick Boseman and George Poage taught us anything, it is that in the face of adversity, you rise up. And rise up we will. We won’t let hate win, and I hope you won’t either, WashU.”

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Importance
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Opinion Submission: For our health and the health of our community, get a booster shot
by Student Life
Jan 13, 2022
“Due to a wave of new COVID cases from the omicron variant sweeping across the United States, Washington University will start off the spring semester with two weeks of online classes and restricted access for campus spaces. As we all try to stay safe in the weeks ahead, we want to urge you to get your booster shot: They are safe, effective and one of the best ways to help us return to in-person gatherings and activities.
One of the reasons why the omicron variant is particularly dangerous to public health is because the immunity we gained from our first doses of the vaccine (two doses of Pfizer or Moderna, or one dose of Johnson & Johnson) has waned and is less effective at preventing omicron compared to earlier variants. However, booster shots substantially improve immunity and health outcomes for those who get them. The Pfizer and Moderna booster shots increase antibody levels against Omicron 20- to 100-fold. Boosters almost eliminate the risk of severe infection and hospitalization for most people, and likely reduce the risk of catching the virus at all and passing it to others, thus providing protection both for those who receive the booster shot and for those around you.
The booster shot is also overwhelmingly safe. By the end of 2021, over 68 million booster shots had been administered across the United States, and over 448 million across the globe. They have been endorsed by political leaders on both sides of the aisle, from President Biden to former President Trump . All three of us have taken our booster shots as well, with little to no side effects — and it’s why we are encouraging you to do the same.
Taking your booster shot at this moment is about protecting all the members of our community at WashU and in St. Louis. Today, our hospitals are being overwhelmed . Getting boosted protects you, and everyone around you by ensuring hospitals can provide the care necessary for all people who need their help –– and before you return to virtual classes on the 18th, we urge you to take the time to make an appointment at your local clinic or pharmacy to get your booster shot, too. 
To find a local clinic or pharmacy to get a booster shot, you can go to vaccines.gov for more information.
If you have questions about the university’s COVID-19 reopening policy, please review the Spring 2022 FAQ and email covidquestions@wustl.edu or share them with Student Union at president@su.wustl.edu .”

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Alkilani resigns as Student Union VP of Finance
by Student Life
Jan 12, 2022
“Courtesy of Student Union Fadel Alkilani stands in Knight Hall for his official SU photo that he submitted to Student Life ahead of the spring 2021 elections
Student Union Vice President of Finance senior Fadel Alkilani resigned Wednesday afternoon, writing in an email to student group officers that the departure of multiple members of SU’s professional business staff had made his position’s workload unreasonable. 
Alkilani had served as a Treasury representative since his freshman year, and was elected to the position of Vice President of Finance last spring. His campaign focused on his SU experience and ability to get things done, such as simplifying the general budget process to eliminate redundancies. Alkilani also became the subject of controversy this fall when a video of him removing commemorative flags from a campus 9/11 memorial went viral and sparked online backlash from right-wing groups.
According to the Student Union constitution , if a member of the executive board resigns, the SU president is responsible for appointing a successor, who must then be approved by both the Treasury and Senate. 
Student Union President Ranen Miao did not respond to a request for comment in time for publication.
Alkilani wrote that over the course of the fall semester factors such as the departure of business manager Janice Davidse and other members of SU’s business staff, as well as the transition to Presence , a new financial platform, meant that just balancing the budget and doing student group budgeting had been a major time commitment for him. 
“It is no longer reasonable for me to shoulder this burden,” he wrote in the email to student group officers. “Last semester I was putting in dozens of hours a week, and that was without these additional commitments, and with the assistance of twice as many business coordinators.”
The Student Union Office is located on the second floor of the DUC (Holden Hindes | Student Life)
The department of Campus Life, which is responsible for hiring SU’s business coordinators, wrote in a statement to Student Life that “we are always interested in student feedback and ways we can better help support our student leaders and student groups,” but did not address the specifics of Aklilani’s resignation or the concerns he had raised. 
SU leaders are still working out how to move forward in Alkilani’s absence. The VP Finance is responsible for balancing SU’s $3.7 million budget and ensuring that student groups are adequately funded. Speaker of the Treasury junior Max Roitblat said that in past cases when the VP of Finance position has become vacant, the three leaders in Treasury: the speaker, budget committee chair and activities committee chair have filled in to cover the VP’s duties while a successor is chosen. He said that the constitutional council will meet this upcoming week to determine the exact details and timeline of the appointment process.
Roitblat added that Campus Life is currently in the process of hiring a business manager, and plans on posting a job listing for a new business coordinator. However, he argued that in the long run, SU will need more administrative support from Campus Life in order to avoid future cases of burnout. 
“I hope that Campus Life goes back to its old practice of having one business manager and three coordinators since that really is what I believe is needed to handle student group business issues with our continuously growing amount of student groups on campus,” Roitblat wrote in a statement to Student Life. “We make a contribution every year to Campus Life as Student Union that we ask to go towards the hiring of these staff members, but we haven’t had a third business coordinator in place since fall of 2019 meaning we have always been at least one member short of the full intended team that SU puts money towards.”
In a separate email to SU executive board members, professional staff and Treasury members Wednesday, Alkilani discouraged others from applying to his former position. 
“I encourage you to prioritize yourself and to move forward as you need to give yourself space,” he wrote. “I cannot stress enough that this position is not worth it and that I do not recommend anyone to take it.”
We have updated this story as of 9:13 a.m. on Thursday, Jan. 13 to include a statement from Speaker of the Treasury Max Roitblat.”

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College of Arts and Sciences announces plans for new building alongside 10-year strategic plan
by Student Life
Jan 03, 2022
“The new building will be located on what is currently green space north of Graham Chapel and west of Olin Library (Courtesy of the Source)
Washington University administrators announced plans for a new Arts & Sciences building in addition to releasing their strategic plan for the next decade, Dec. 8. 
The building will be located on what is currently green space west of Olin Library and north of Graham Chapel. Speaking at the video event announcing the building, Chancellor Andrew Martin described the building as “a visual bookend to Seigle Hall.”
Dean of Arts & Sciences Dr. Feng Sheng Hu told Student Life that administrators had made this decision with the future growth of Arts and Sciences in mind.
“In Arts & Sciences, we have made great use of our existing space and we have not added a new building for about 15 years,” Hu wrote in a statement to Student Life. “But now we are at a point where our most exciting plans for the future require additional space.”
The University has not yet determined which departments or programs will be housed in the new building, which is so far unnamed. 
Some students have taken to social media to post their frustration about the new building, saying that it will take away from the green space on campus.
In response to these concerns, writing to Student Life, Jamie Kolker, Associate Vice Chancellor and University Architect, said that the “site planning, building and landscape design” will consider and balance the surrounding greenery and nature.
The University’s last major construction project on the East End caused some inconveniences for students, creating roadblocks and temporarily closing some buildings. Although the construction details are not yet finalized, Kolker said that the University “will focus on minimizing impact to adjacent circulation routes and being very mindful of construction noise.”
The announcement about the new building was jointly released with the Arts & Sciences strategic plan for the upcoming decade.
The plan, which includes four “foundational strengths” and six “strategic pillars,” which include a “literacy-based approach” to Arts & Sciences curriculum, a new program in global health and a commitment to interdisciplinary scholarship.
Hu told Student Life that the new global health major, which was previously a track within the Anthropology major, is being created to allow those students interested in global health to be more interdisciplinary and select coursework in biology, ecology, cultural studies and “historical perspectives on health.”
Another major pillar of the plan focuses on advancing scholarship in  “race, power, equity, and justice.” Hu said that the University’s new Transdisciplinary Research Institute in the Applied Data Sciences (TRIADS) will help advance this goal by applying big data to projects related to those ideas.
Hu added that he hopes Arts and Sciences’ new building will generate more excitement for the school’s new initiatives and programs, while also serving as an important communal space.
“This building gives us a new and highly visible presence at the heart of campus — a home for Arts & Sciences both literally and figuratively — and my hope is it becomes a gathering place for our entire community,” Hu told The Source.
Further details about the building’s plans and timeline are scheduled to be announced early this year.”

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Opinion Submission: For space equity, dehouse WashU fraternities
by Student Life
Jan 03, 2022
“The Sigma Alpha Epsilon house on WashU’s Fraternity Row. Photo by Curran Neenan | Student Life
Of over 400 student groups at Washington University in St. Louis, only one type of organization has their own set of houses: Interfraternity Council fraternities. While fraternity men, who are disproportionately wealthy and white , have access to nine houses on campus, students from marginalized communities have little to no space to build community. On campus, the Women’s Building, Sakeenah and Hamsini House are among the only spaces allocated for students of historically marginalized backgrounds to build community. That’s why we are calling on WashU to terminate their housing contracts with fraternities and designate current fraternity houses as affinity houses instead.
Research has shown that fraternity housing is responsible for so many of the harms that Greek Life perpetuates on WashU’s campus, including alcoholism , hazing and sexual assault . By granting a small group of men exclusive access to a residential space for their members at a central location on campus, paired with little to no accountability for interpersonal violence or conduct violations, fraternity houses enable toxic masculinity , rape culture and violence to fester. A paper by Lehigh University professors found that fraternity houses were dangerous places for women; in 2018, a student survey of sexual violence amongst sorority sisters corroborated these findings, reporting that a sixth had experienced unwanted sexual contact or interpersonal violence by fraternity members. The author of the survey concluded: “There are no safe fraternities.”
Furthermore, fraternities have done nothing to earn the space they occupy. If student groups like cultural organizations or a cappella groups don’t have housing for their members, there is no reason why fraternities deserve special status as student groups. On the contrary, when fraternity houses were first built and given to fraternities, WashU had still not yet admitted Black students in all its programs, fraternities nationwide enforced rigid exclusion of racial minorities , and “ Aryan clauses ” in fraternity constitutions barred Jewish (and other non-Christian, non-white) students from joining. The University has failed to make an affirmative case for why fraternities are more deserving of this housing than any of the other over 400 groups on campus. Continuing to enable fraternities to occupy these houses only sends the message that the University accepts and endorses unequal treatment of its students, giving special favor to disproportionately white, wealthy and straight men. 
In contrast, affinity housing has been shown to offer immense benefits to college campuses, especially for the most marginalized students. They create space for students from diverse identities to explore their identities, build community and be surrounded by peers who have shared lived experiences . Establishing these houses means that we can create spaces where LGBTQIA+ students won’t have to worry about homophobic or transphobic roommates; where students of color can connect with our cultural and historical backgrounds, at an institution that is predominantly white; and where religious students can explore their faith, pray and live together. These spaces help students feel more welcome on their campuses, provide beneficial events and programming to the student body, and offer a strong residential support system to lean on and speak with when encountering racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia, antisemitism or discrimination on campus. 
We are calling for Washington University to terminate their housing contracts with IFC fraternities, and publicly commit to reallocating fraternity houses as affinity space for Black, Latinx, Asian, Indigenous, MENA, low-income, international, LGBTQIA+, female, Muslim, Jewish and differently-abled students. Students from diverse backgrounds have long been tokenized by WashU, without receiving the necessary material institutional support to ensure our voices are uplifted. The Hamsini House replacing Phi Delta Theta and transfer housing replacing Beta Theta Pi are only the first steps in creating long-lasting change in the pursuit of equity: For too long, fraternities have occupied too much undeserved space on campus. This step is necessary in creating a more equal and just community, where all students will feel and know that they belong.
Signed,
Tinuola B. Adebukola, President of WashU’s Women & Non-Binary Multi-cultural Association
Maurice Wang, Mandy Feenstra, and Ranen Miao, co-presidents of the Asian Multicultural Council
Amadi MuseMorris, President of the Association of Black Students
Christian Monzon, President of the Association of Latin American Students
Trey Davis, President of the Black Men’s Coalition
Alexandra Khalil, President of the Middle Eastern and North African Association
Alec Fields, President of the Jewish Students Association
Briana Garil, President of the Hillel Leadership Council
Sabrina Lozada and Alex Herrera, Carnaval Directors
Bryanna Mendez and Carlos Cepeda , Latinxpresión Directors
Jessica Huang and Ally Sun, co-executive directors of LNYF
Nayana Vuppala, Co-President of Ashoka, Garba, & Former Member of Alpha Phi
Audrey Pilgrim, President of WashU Pride Alliance
Lane Bohrer, Facilitator with Transcending Gender
Onyi Onyeador, President of Teaching Racial Understanding Through Honesty
Helen Webley-Brown, President of European Horizons at WashU
Mandy Feenstra, President of the Vietnamese Students Association
Drew Perkoski, Acting Vice President of Social Programming for Hillel Leadership Council
Lauren Blaydon, Speaker of the Congress of the South 40
Angela Gormley, President of Reflections
Sandhya Thomas, Group Coordinator of Sur Taal Laya A Cappella
Dakotah Jennifer and Jihoun Im, Group Coordinators of Sensasians Acappella
Alice Na and Uma Kocherlakota, Co-Presidents of PL4Y 
Emily Angstreich and Lily Swenson, Co-Presidents of Uncle Joe’s Peer Counseling and Resource Center
Cam Lind, President of KWUR
Hannah Grimes and Kiana Angela Macharia, Co-Presidents of WU-Slam
Emma Singh, President of WashU College Democrats and Roosevelt Network
Ethan Shen, President of YoWU
Frances Wu, President of WashU Pre-Law Society
Lawton Blanchard, President of Burning Kumquat
Sarah Rosen, Secretary of Planned Parenthood Generation Action
Meenu Bhooshanan , member of Ekta
Michelle Perez , President of Alpha Psi Lambda 
Philip Keisler, President of Phi Delta Phi Honor Society
Izzy Jefferis, Former President of Lambda Q and member of Pi Beta Phi
John Harry Wagner, Ex-Social Chair and Brotherhood Chair of Beta Theta Pi
Dora Tabachnick, President of WashU Save a Child’s Heart 
Layna Paraboschi , President of Alpha Phi Omega
Maya Gregory, President of WashU Children’s Project and Former Member of Chi Omega
Emily Regan, Former President of the Women’s Panhellenic Association
President of MeToo Washu
Matthew Berman, Former Director of Social Justice for Washington University Interfraternity Council
Jaclyn Liu , Co-President of Partners in East St. Louis & Former Member of Alpha Omicron Pi
Emma Platt, SU Senate Diversity and Inclusion Committee Chair
Braxton Sizemore, Speaker of SU Senate
Nkemjika Emenike , Former Speaker of SU Senate 
Miri Goodman, Student Body Vice President of Programming and President of the Social Programming Board
Miriam Silberman, Student Body Executive Vice President
Ranen Miao, Student Body President”

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Underpass Black history mural vandalized with white supremacist propaganda
by Student Life
Jan 01, 2022
“The painting of Rep. John Lewis on the Underpass mural after students cleaned off some of Saturday night’s vandalism. (Photo by Curran Neenan / Student Life)
White supremacists vandalized the Black history mural on Washington University’s South 40 Underpass Saturday night, spray-painting a hate group’s logo and messages over artists’ depictions of Black leaders such as Rep. John Lewis, Olympian George Poage and actor Chadwick Boseman. 
The spray-paint consisted of a white base layer underneath red and blue messages in support of Patriot Front, a white nationalist hate group the Anti-Defamation League found was responsible for 80% of white supremacist propaganda distribution incidents nationally in 2020.
Chancellor Andrew Martin and three other University administrators condemned the vandalism in a letter to students, faculty and staff Sunday morning.
“This is horrifying and distressing. We’re shocked and saddened by this hateful act on our campus,” the administrators wrote. “Let us say again, so there is absolutely no room for doubt: Washington University stands unequivocally against hate, bigotry, racism, xenophobia and discrimination in any form. There is no place on our campus for these behaviors and this type of harmful action will not be tolerated or ignored.”
The administrators wrote that “a small group of unknown individuals” had vandalized the mural, adding that the University hoped to use cameras in the area of the Underpass to “identify and hold these individuals responsible for their disgraceful actions.”
The painting of Chadwick Boseman after students had cleared some of the vandalism. (Photo by Curran Neenan / Student Life)
Flyers for Patriot Front, a splinter group from the organization that organized the 2017 “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, had been placed on campus in recent weeks, in a similar manner to their placement at Missouri State University and others earlier this year . 
The University was aware of the Patriot Front flyers on campus, Vice Chancellor for Marketing and Communications Julie Flory wrote in an email to Student Life Sunday afternoon. “In each instance we removed the flyers, and [the Washington University Police Department] began an investigation,” she wrote. “WUPD continues to work with its regional and federal law enforcement partners to look into these incidents.”
According to Flory, a student came to the WUPD station on the South 40 just before midnight to report the vandalism and other reports came in within minutes. “WUPD arrived on the scene within several minutes of the first report and gathered evidence, and then students painted over the vandalism,” Flory wrote. 
One student told Student Life Sunday that she and others who were walking through the Underpass found the vandalism at around 12:15 a.m. The students returned roughly 20 minutes later with nail polish remover to start cleaning the mural, the student said, adding that she did not see WUPD officers at the Underpass until the group was mid-way through removing the vandalism.
“ In total, there was a little over an hour from the time of the first report until students had covered the vandalism,” Flory wrote to Student Life. 
Much of the vandalism remained Sunday morning. While the Patriot Front logo and messages had been mostly covered or erased, the white spray-paint over the Black figures still remained. 
Flory added that the University was not yet sure of a timeline or process for the restoration of the mural. “We will be working with the artists and our student organizations to replace or repair the artwork in the underpass,” she wrote.
In an Instagram post Sunday , the Center for Diversity and Inclusion’s team wrote they were “infuriated” by the vandalism of the mural. “We are heartbroken to see the destruction of a space meant to celebrate and uplift Black excellence,” the CDI’s post read. “They can try to deface our history, but the legacies and influence of John Lewis, Chadwick Boseman and George Poage will never be covered up. We are so sorry this is one more thing that adds to an already difficult time especially as we move through the end of Finals Week and the beginning of winter break.” 
Local artists had painted the mural, titled “The Story That Never Ends,” in the summer of 2020, and the mural had remained there since. In past years the Underpass has featured painted advertisements for student groups and events, but Campus Life has not allowed painting this fall, citing COVID-19 restrictions and insufficient staffing.  The mural was a collaborative “freestyle,” De’Joneiro Jones, the project lead, told Student Life last September. “I wanted it to include a lot of history, because I knew in the height of where we were…with the racial tension and all of the things going on in the world—the political climate, the socio-political ills of society—I thought it would be appropriate to add words into the artwork, and also incorporate images of Black [people], [especially] dealing with a lot of St. Louis history,” he said.
A student bicycles past the original mural on the Underpass during the fall 2020 semester. (Photo by Curran Neenan / Student Life)
The University administrators wrote that the mural “has been a source of pride and inspiration” for the University community. “We will not let this act of cowardice deter us from celebrating our rich cultural histories, especially the outstanding contributions of people who have led the way toward greater equity and understanding,” they wrote.”

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Stop gatekeeping the humanities
by Student Life
Jan 01, 2022
“As a friend annoyedly turns a page in “The Price for Their Pound of Flesh” and I work my way through a theory assignment, we begin to discuss how much bigger the audience for this material would be if it were written in a way that everyone could access. The main question we sought to answer: What’s the point of making it so hard to read if it’s a concept you want everyone to get? To be clear, she loved that book, and I enjoy Judith Butler as much as the next person, but our conversation quickly turned to the question of why almost every insightful text we read takes hours to get through and how, had they been worded differently, the same idea could have been developed in a far more accessible way for all audiences.
If my friend and I weren’t college students, there’s a good chance we wouldn’t have read those texts at all. This is especially important considering the specific texts we were reading are presumably for everyone; or, at least, everyone would benefit from being exposed to the information they contain. The history of the commodification of the Black body is obviously something that is, as expressed in “The Prince for Their Pound of Flesh,” an idea hoped to become a household conversation, so it’s worth considering who has access to reading and understanding the conversation proposed. Similarly, the social construction of gender is expertly explored by renowned theorist Judith Butler, but is her target audience only other scholars? If the goal is to encourage people to be more inclusive, to think more progressively and to generally have a better understanding of why racism, homophobia, genderphobia, etc. are faulty and ill-informed behaviors, then why is the best information on these topics being written in a way that is most logical for consumption in a college classroom? 
This isn’t an attack on authors enjoying their craft or displaying their knowledge of their fields. But when it comes to certain information, accessibility, not excessive vocabulary, should be prioritized. The famed “For Dummies” series does this by taking subjects like philosophy, law and sociology –– topics generally thought to be hard to understand –– and putting them in layman’s terms for all audiences to enjoy, regardless of whether or not they are college-educated or have specialized in the field. So why can’t all modern social ideas be proposed this way? Non-college-educated people are not actually “dummies,” and many could read and understand the theoretical texts in question, but most people, regardless of educational status, would prefer important texts be written in a more approachable way. Some of Butler’s and other scholars’ arguments are probably going to be a bit more complex for the general reader to grasp, regardless of how they’re worded, if said readers aren’t familiar with reading theoretical works. However, unnecessarily confusing language only makes those difficult concepts that much harder to get. This ultimately results in gatekeeping information that the masses should and are intended to know.
At a time when participation in activism and social movements is incredibly important, there is still a stark disconnect in knowledge and understanding due to who relevant material is being written for. Perhaps it’s time to challenge the idea of life-changing information being written exclusively for scholars.
If you have any feedback on the Forum section as a whole, please leave your thoughts in  this form .”

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Staff Editorial: How your participation in Greek Life enables continued harm
by Student Life
Jan 01, 2022
“Tuesday Hadden
This weekend, Sorority and Fraternity Life will host three open houses advertising Greek Life to students. Washington University’s Campus Life office advertised the open houses via posting a flyer on their Instagram on Nov. 23. This is in preparation for spring rush, when students — including freshmen, who cannot rush in their fall semester — vie for places in the campus’s various Greek Life organizations. 
This year’s spring rush will not occur until after the winter holidays, but some chapters have already added members to their organizations this semester. During the first weeks of school, members of the Chi Omega national organization came to campus to recruit students to join the sorority. They had success; Chi Omega’s Instagram page features a post with the new pledge class on their bid day from Sept. 24. 
But Chi Omega nationals recruiting at the beginning of the school year is not a common occurrence. It is a consequence of the events of the last two years on this campus — in particular, July of 2020, when Chi Omega’s executive board circulated a statement that current members would deactivate their membership . This fall, the national organization was not merely recruiting; they were rebuilding the chapter, effectively re-colonizing it. And they were far from the only Greek Life organization to suffer a severe drop in membership. 
Those of us who attended WashU before the summer of 2020, this year’s junior and senior classes, likely remember the issues surrounding Greek Life that came to prominence that summer. Those newer to the University likely do not. So before you decide to rush, here is a summary of the issues with Greek Life on WashU’s campus for the last two years.
In September 2019, a new fraternity colonized WashU: Delta Chi. Student Life’s Editorial Board felt that the presence of another fraternity, at a time when other universities were downsizing their Greek Life presence, was cause for concern . Even before then, administrators and students had been made aware of the widespread sexual violence among fraternities, and only the year before, in 2018, a fraternity was permanently suspended from campus after the University found firearms in the fraternity house while the fraternity was already temporarily suspended. That expulsion prompted a compilation of headlines about negative Greek Life incidents on campus — a long list. Following Delta Chi’s arrival on campus, the Editorial Board once again called for change in WashU’s handling of Greek Life in early 2020. 
A @blackatwashu Instagram post from June of 2020 accusing a Chi Omega member of racist words and actions brought the issue into the campus spotlight. Greek Life was founded on exclusion , and arguments to that effect led two sororities, Alpha Omicron Pi and Pi Beta Phi , to disband. In fraternities and sororities that did not disband, over 50% of members dropped . Students protested the organizations, calling for abolition. In one Student Union survey from the summer of 2020, 65% of student respondents favored Greek Life abolition, though Campus Life dismissed calls for abolition in favor of reforming the organizations. And while the Women’s Panhellenic Association has made some reforms to the recruitment and bidding process , systemic change has been slow, if existent at all. 
Prior to 2021’s spring rush, Student Life reported that sororities had between five and 42 active members; before the summer of 2020, all had more than 100. The Editorial Board called for students to abstain from rushing. Ten months ago, we wrote in that editorial that “Greek Life should have no place on our campus.” We stand by this statement. 
We understand that, for many underclassmen, Greek Life appears to be a perfect way to form community and engage in the WashU social scene. Particularly for freshmen and sophomores — who are further removed from the Greek Life activism of the summer of 2020, and for whom forming connections has been unusually difficult — we recognize the allure of an organization that promises you instant community. However, as we wrote earlier in the semester, clubs and activities with friends offer these benefits. Better yet, they do not come with the weight of years of systemic racism, queerphobia, socioeconomic discrimination and other forms of exclusion. 
As chapters like Chi Omega move on from the past and recruit new classes, it is tempting — but unacceptable — to forget why Greek Life participation has been so fraught for so many years. To underclassmen considering rush: Given this heavy history, is Greek Life worth it? The answer, plain and simple, is no. By participating in Greek Life, you continue a system which has oppressed and otherwise harmed large segments of the population. You participate in an organization whose founding and, indeed, current activities, was based in and perpetuates racism. The prospect of social community, which can be found elsewhere, does not justify the continuation of Greek Life on campus. 
Editor’s Note: We have updated this story as of 9:15 a.m. on. Friday, Dec. 3 to clarify that the University never explicitly said that firearms were the reason for a fraternity’s permanent suspension in 2018.
Staff editorials reflect the opinion of the majority of our editorial board members. The editorial board operates independently of our newsroom and includes members of the senior staff. 
Managing Editor: Isabella Neubauer
Senior Forum Editors: Reilly Brady, Jamila Dawkins
Senior Cadenza Editor: Gracie Hime
Senior Sports Editor: Grady Nance
Senior Copy Editor: Grady Nance
Senior Multimedia Editor: Jaden Satenstein, HN Hoffmann
Senior Social Media Editor: Sabrina Spence
Senior Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Editor: Ani Kesanapally
If you have any feedback on the Forum section as a whole, please leave your thoughts in  this form .”

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Future of spring 2022 study abroad to be determined in mid-December amid concerns over omicron variant
by Student Life
Jan 01, 2022
“A bulletin board in the Office of Overseas Programs shows the experiences of students who studied abroad. (Curran Neenan \ Student Life)
Washington University Overseas Programs will decide in mid-December if spring study abroad programs will go on as planned amid rising concerns about the omicron variant.
Study abroad at the University has been suspended since students were sent home during their spring 2020 programs due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. The omicron variant, first sequenced in South Africa on Nov. 24 but now known to have first been in Europe, has been confirmed in 23 countries , including the United States. The WHO has labeled omicron a “ variant of concern ” for its high number of mutations.
Global Travel Safety Manager Catherine Dalton told Student Life in a Wednesday interview that she is working with the University’s Division of Infectious Diseases to determine whether the variant poses a significant risk to students traveling abroad in the spring.
“Where we’re at right now is we don’t have enough data to know,” Dalton said. “So we’re working closely with the Infectious Disease Division to analyze what does come through, but we want to make sure we’re making as fully informed of a decision as possible. We don’t want to make a decision too early and then prematurely jeopardize students’ experiences for the spring, but we also want to take into account that things continue to change.”
Dalton noted that her team is considering three main factors as they analyze the developing data on the variant throughout the next two weeks: transmissibility, severity of illness and the efficacy of vaccines against omicron. The University is also assessing the feasibility of different programs by monitoring the entry and movement restrictions in host countries. Dalton noted that her team decided not to offer multiple programs due to restrictions and concerns over programs’ ability to ensure student safety.
Certain programs did not make it through the review process, Dalton wrote in a follow-up email to Student Life. 
“Other programs in Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands and Spain were approved,” Dalton wrote. “However, those that did not make it through the review were those that did not yet have experience supporting study abroad students during COVID. The programs in China, Hong Kong, Singapore and South Korea that did not make it through were due to strict entry requirements or border closures in those countries.”
On Tuesday, Overseas Programs sent an email regarding the mid-December decision to students planning to study abroad in the spring and said that “we strongly recommend that you get a booster shot in preparation for your departure.”
“Many countries are revising their definition of ‘fully vaccinated’ to include a booster shot,” Overseas Programs said. “Not being ‘fully vaccinated’ could significantly hinder your experience, as well as add costs to maintain the necessary testing regimen to be able to participate in your local community.”
The University has also prepared for the possibility of the developing COVID-19 situation forcing students to travel home or shift to remote learning after their programs begin. 
“The Study Abroad Offices and the International Travel Oversight Committee worked hard to identify programs that had their own continuity plan of, ‘We will go hybrid. We will offer whatever it may be within their plans to make sure that students’ academics aren’t interrupted,’” Dalton said. “Again, similar to WashU, right? There’s still classes that have the remote option if you’re not feeling well. We looked for programs that were doing the same thing so that students’ academic experience wasn’t significantly interrupted.”
Some students have been frustrated with the University’s communication regarding the status of spring study abroad programs. Junior Hannah Leibovich is planning to participate in the Sam Fox Florence Semester program in the spring and said while it was frustrating to not hear the program was on until mid-October, she understands it’s a complicated decision.
“It was frustrating, but at the same time I want to be empathetic because, if I were an administrator at a school or working on a study abroad program, I would also be very stressed about deciding whether or not to let these students go,” Leibovich said. “And so, I understand that it’s not an easy decision.”
Junior Shira Lyss-Loren is participating in a program in Chile through School for International Training (SIT) in the spring and said she receives information from both SIT and the University.
“WashU’s communication has definitely been more frequent… I guess technically better communication because I’m getting more of it but without a whole lot of actual information,” Lyss-Loren said. “It’s been a lot of, like, ‘Stay flexible. Stay on your feet. You don’t know what’s going to happen. Always have a backup plan.’”
Lyss-Loren said that while the flexible messaging works for some things, like registering for spring classes, things like housing are not able to be as easily adjusted.
In regard to COVID-19, Lyss-Loren also noted that she’s waiting until winter break to get a COVID-19 vaccine booster shot in hopes of having the highest possible resistance to the virus throughout the program.
Leibovich said that she’s trying not to think about the possibility of the Florence Semester program being canceled because studying abroad is a big portion of her vision for the rest of her time in college.
“If it gets canceled, I kind of spent this semester expecting to not be here next semester and my vision of the rest of my time at WashU, a big part of that is spending a semester away in Italy and so not going would be… it would kind of really shake me.”
Orli Sheffey contributed reporting.”

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WUPD increases off-campus presence following pattern of burglaries
by Student Life
Jan 01, 2022
“A WUPD patrol car turns onto Forsyth Boulevard. Interim Chief Dave Goodwin said he was not sure how long the increased presence would last. (Photo by Kivanc Dundar / Student Life)
The Washington University Police Department in recent weeks has increased its overnight presence in neighborhoods north and west of campus in response to a string of late-night and early-morning burglaries this fall at off-campus student apartments in non-University housing.
The increase is a “short-term” approach, WUPD interim chief Dave Goodwin told Student Life in an interview Tuesday. Goodwin said WUPD would maintain the expanded presence, which consists of additional officers assigned to “hotspot” areas in early morning hours, for an indefinite period of time. 
WUPD sent out the first security memo regarding an off-campus burglary on Sept. 23 before sending additional ones on Sept. 25, Sept. 26 and Oct. 26 about other burglaries. On Nov. 17, the department sent out a crime alert, which is issued for an ongoing incident or trend involving public safety, Goodwin said, while security memos are meant for specific, isolated events that typically occurred off-campus. 
“Over the past eight weeks, WUPD has learned of several burglaries in off-campus apartments rented by WashU students,” read the Nov. 17 alert, which came after burglaries in three apartments of the same building on Washington Avenue. “In almost all of these cases, access was initially gained through ground floor apartment windows or doors by standing on chairs or nearby objects. Most of the windows or doors were unlocked, including apartments on the upper levels of the buildings.” 
Goodwin declined to say how many additional officers the increased presence entailed and was not sure how long the increase would last. “It really depends on if something else happens,” he said. “So far, it seems to have negated the situation, but you can never be 100% sure.”
Goodwin said WUPD officers typically do “hotspot patrols” in “areas that have been frequented” by crimes, meaning that every 15 to 20 minutes, an officer is driving through the area, passing out safety literature or otherwise “engaging the community.” The additional officers will strengthen that existing presence, Goodwin said. “While those other officers are driving around doing police stuff and handling other calls, those [additional] officers are specifically in those areas and not necessarily subject to call. They’re there specifically to just drive in those areas.” 
In addition to those patrols, WUPD is partnering with the University City Police Department to conduct “collaborative patrols,” Goodwin said, adding that WUPD is also doing outreach to landlords and the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department. WUPD and UCPD will be assigned to work together during the peak times of criminal activity.
When asked about the benefits and consequences of the additional patrols, particularly in relation to communities of color, Goodwin focused on police presence as a deterrent. “Our job when we work with University City is presence — we want to be seen, number one,” he said. “With burglaries in particular that presence is very important; you hope to convey a sense of that community strength that is there.” 
While 68% of white respondents to the public safety committee’s survey last fall reported feeling comfortable or very comfortable in their interactions with WUPD, 50% of Black respondents and 55% of Hispanic/Latino respondents reported that level of comfort.
When asked again about students of color potentially feeling unsafe with increased police presence, Goodwin said that “We approach our patrol in such a way to our fair and impartial policing, that really, our engagement is due to somebody’s actions. Not their appearance, not their clothing… It is clearly what they are doing that prompts the response, not anything else.”
Research has shown that implicit bias, the automatic associations people make between groups of people and stereotypes, has significant influence on the outcomes of interactions with citizens and police.
Students walking near the Ackert Walkway overpass to University City Wednesday afternoon expressed mixed reactions to the increased patrols.
“It definitely seems like a viable solution,” junior Jonny Chiu said. “I’m happy that the school is actually doing something about this.” Still, Chiu said he did not think the expanded police presence would completely stop crimes, adding that students should continue to make sure their windows and doors remained locked.
“I don’t know how effective it’s actually going to be, but I don’t know that WUPD increasing their patrols is necessarily a bad thing,” senior Patrick Doyle said. “It seems like a pretty standard response.”
Graduate student Francisco Tijerina was critical of the expanded patrols. “It’s a natural response to crime rising, but it’s not really addressing the issues from the root,” Tijerina said, adding that the University contributes to economic inequality in nearby neighborhoods that helps lead to crimes. 
Tijerina said that he worried about the effects of increased patrols. “I think it provokes more discrimination against Black and other minority populations and a lot more reification of white, hegemonical power,” he said. “The response is insufficient to the problem and only provokes more social anxiety toward the populations that don’t feel safe around the police,” he said.
Orli Sheffey and Nina Giraldo contributed reporting .”

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It’s three weeks into basketball season: Here’s where WashU’s teams stand
by Student Life
Jan 01, 2022
“Senior Justin Hardy fights through traffic to go up for a shot against Coe College in 2019. Hardy has averaged 14 points per game so far this season. (Photo by Grace Bruton / Student Life)
Three weeks into the winter season, the Washington University men’s and women’s basketball teams have shown a glimpse of what to expect. As both teams begin to settle back into competition, let’s look at what’s happened in their seasons so far. 
Women’s basketball (1-4, vs. University of Wisconsin-Superior, Friday 7:30 p.m. at the Field House)
The women’s team has stumbled out of the gate, but their unattractive 1-4 record does not reflect how competitive their games have been. Three of their four losses this season have come by margins of three points or fewer. With a few shots falling their way, the record could easily look much better. A win in their most recent matchup against Illinois Wesleyan hopefully signals that the team can begin closing games. 
On the offensive side, junior Maya Arnott has been at the center of the action, leading the team in points, rebounds and free throw opportunities. Juniors Naomi Jackson and Molly Gannon have continued their deep-ball shooting from the 2019-2020 season with eight each, and sophomore Jessica Brooks has made an impact in her first taste of competition as well. 
Many aspects of the Bears’ offensive performance, however, have yet to find their rhythm. The Bears’ three-point shooting percentage has varied greatly in the early season, with two performances below 18% contrasted with a stellar 47% mark in their win against Illinois Wesleyan.
Similarly, their turnover rate has hindered some of their closing opportunities. In three of their four losses, the Bears have suffered more turnovers than their opponent — most importantly, those turnovers came late. They’ve turned the ball over more in the fourth quarter than any other time in their games thus far, which explains some of their late fades. If the team wants to lock down wins down the stretch, they’ll need to tighten up in the final minutes. 
The Bears didn’t make the NCAA tournament in the 2019-2020 season and posted a 7-7 record in the University Athletic Association within their 14-11 overall record. While that was a down year, WashU has retained four of their five starters from that season. With that experienced core, complemented by young contributors like Brooks and sophomore Lauren Chao, they hope to post a stronger year and make a push for the UAA title they last captured in the 2018-2019 season.
Men’s basketball (5-1, vs. Hendrix, Friday 5:30 p.m. at the Field House)
After a thrilling buzzer-beater win opened their season against Millikin, the No. 20 men’s basketball team has shot out to a 5-1 record going into December. A loss to Webster in their second game marked two straight outings with a field-goal percentage under 35%, but the Bears have since found their rhythm, shooting above 40% in all of their last four games and above 50% in three of them. 
The strength on the offensive end is due in no small part to their three-point shooting. Led by graduate student Jack Nolan, the Bears are shooting an astounding 42% from three, and while that number may fade slightly as the season goes on (in past years they’ve typically hovered around 37%), expect the deep ball to factor heavily into WashU’s success. Along with Nolan’s team-leading 20 points per game, senior forward Justin Hardy has been a leader on the attack, averaging 14 points and leading the team in rebounds and assists. 
Since the Bears’ loss to Webster, their increased efficiency on offense coupled with strong defensive play all around has led to some lopsided scores: they’ve won two games by 30-point margins, and the other two came by 22 and 18-point margins. 
WashU is currently the highest-ranked UAA team, ahead of No. 22 Emory, the only other top-25 team. Every UAA competitor currently has a winning record, setting the stage for a competitive slate of matchups come January and February. 
After COVID brought a heartbreaking stop to the Bears’ deepest run in the NCAA tournament since 2009 in the 2019-2020 season, the strong start brews hope that they can pick up where they left off. While the team has lost three of the starting five from that season to graduation, many key contributors like Hardy, Nolan, senior Charlie Jacob and senior Kameron Mack remain to bridge the gap. With new faces making immediate impacts, such as freshman Hayden Doyle, who has started every game this season, the Bears have much to be excited about moving forward. 
For both teams, that excitement includes playing in front of a crowd. The men’s and women’s matchups against Hendrix College and University of Wisconsin-Superior, respectively, will be the first Friday night home games in nearly two years — an experience both squads have undoubtedly missed. With the stands filled and hopes high, the Bears hope they can deliver two wins and build momentum early in the season. 
 ”

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Editor’s Note season 2 episode 10: Voter turnout jumps in SU elections
by Student Life
Jan 01, 2022
“Graphic by Christine Watrdige / Student Life
This year’s fall Student Union Election generated a lot of talk around campus, with a 34% voter turnout , a stark contrast to recent fall’s voter turnouts, which were between 15% and 25%. The jump in voter turnout came as a result of new measures implemented by SU, an unusually high number of candidates and a focus on the issue of Greek Life abolition. Staff Reporter Victoria Hirsh spoke with Managing Editor senior Ted Moskal to figure out why turnout jumped so much. Theme music by Senior Copy Editor JJ Coley.
You can also listen to this week’s episode of Editor’s Note on  Spotify  or  Apple Music .
This transcript has been edited slightly for clarity.
VICTORIA HIRSH (0:09-1:12): The most recent fall Student Union Election generated a lot of talk around campus, with a 34% voter turnout, nine points higher than last year. This is a stark contrast to voter turnouts in recent years, which have hovered between 15% and 25%. So, what made this year so different? An unusually high number of candidates and high stakes as the issue of Greek Life abolition dominated the election.
I’m Victoria Hirsh, and you’re listening to Editor’s Note, Student Life’s weekly podcast breaking down our biggest stories with the reporters and editors that covered them. 
This semester’s 34% voter turnout was similar to 2014, which had the highest engagement in the past eight years. Election engagement began to decrease after 2014 and fell to 14% in 2019. 
I sat down with Managing Editor senior Ted Moskal, who reported on the past election. Moskal outlined the changes Student Union implemented in order to increase voter turnout.
TM (1:13-1:39): One step that was taken this semester was increasing the voting period from 24 hours to 96. So that expansion of the voting period was one big step to really give students more time to vote, give them a chance to actually have their voice heard and think about all the candidates. The voter guide was actually a really big initiative that took a lot of hours and just effort to create and really get everyone’s positions fleshed out. So people have a better idea of who they’re voting for.
VH (1:40-1:48): In addition to helping voters stay engaged with the elections, Moskal noted that the voter guide brings transparency into the process.
TM (1:49-2:09): The fact that people’s positions have been laid out in this public document, the voter guide and that when the next election rolls around, students and voters can look at this guide and say, “Hey, did my representative do what they said they would do? Did they fulfill these things on their platform?” And if so, that’s great, for that person. And if not, maybe that’s an incentive to start getting those things done.
VH (2:10-2:43): Forty-eight candidates ran in the recent fall elections, a large jump from last fall elections’ 30 candidates. With 22 students running for the eleven Treasury positions and 20 students running for the eleven Senate seats, the competition for positions led to candidates’ platforms mattering more than usual. This rise in competition follows discussion about the future of the place of Greek Life in campus life. While SU’s current platform calls for Greek Life abolition and the dehousing of fraternities, some candidates proposed that reforming Greek Life would be a better plan of action.
TM (2:44-3:26): So, Greek Life has been probably the most important issue in this SU Election this fall. SU leading up to this election has been very pro-abolition. They passed a resolution calling for the dehousing of fraternities on campus, I think about a year ago. And their current platform actually calls for the abolition of Greek Life. So Student Union is a very pro-abolition organization as of right now. But what happened this election is that a couple of candidates who were not as enthusiastic about this position had decided to run for it based on the idea that Student Union’s anti-Greek Life position is not really what the student body feels. And they were hoping to push for a Student Union that is more reflective of that.
VH (3:27-3:39): While SU’s platform on Greek Life has led to higher competition and voter turnout this year, Moskal noted that SU’s authority over Greek Life on campus is not as strong as many imagine it to be. 
TM (3:40-4:16): So honestly, although there’s been like a whole lot of fuss about potentially pro Greek Life members being on SU, it’s not going to have, at least in my opinion, it’s not going to have a huge impact on the future of Greek Life at WashU. SU doesn’t have direct control over fraternities or sororities or how they’re administered. That’s up to Campus Life and [the] administration in general. SU can have important roles as an advocacy body. And I think that’s why anti-abolition candidates decide to target SU as an organization. They want to be a part of that push in their direction. But it’s not like it’s not a pivotal part of the role that Greek Life is gonna play.
VH (4:17-4:26): So Abolish Greek Life was pretty active last year, too. So why has the topic of Greek Life made this semester’s election more competitive than the previous semesters?
TM (4:27-4:53): I think there was just a lot going on last fall. There were a lot of other ways that these debates were being played out in other spheres. And right now, the debate over, you know, the abolition of Greek Life has kind of died down. And SU is one of the organizations that’s kind of continually been advocating for space equity and dehousing fraternities. And I think a lot of Greek Life people saw this as a way to continue advocating on their side and pushing back to those efforts.
VH (4:54-5:08): Abolish Greek Life WashU (AGL) endorsed six candidates and denounced candidates who they identified as members of Greek Life in an Instagram post shared November 18th, the first day of voting. Moskal noted the impact AGL’s endorsement had on the election.
TM (5:09-5:35): I think it did have an impact, because all six of the people who were endorsed ended up winning with pretty favorable margins. And the people who were not endorsed or denounced, I guess, would be the word, by them had sort of mixed results getting in. So I think that did have a very real impact. And that really shows the power that Abolish Greek Life still has on campus as an organization. Even though the movement itself has kind of been not as active this fall as it was last year.
VH (5:36-5:54): By the end of the election, five out of the 13 candidates who either identified with or expressed support for Greek Life were elected into the Senate and Treasury. As Ted said, the six candidates who were endorsed by Abolish Greek Life WashU were elected. These mixed results raise questions about the future of SU’s platform.
TM (5:55-6:26): Pro-abolition members of SU are still in the majority. And I don’t necessarily think that it’s going to change parts of SU’s platform regarding Greek Life in a meaningful way. But I think what’s going to happen is the debates surrounding Greek Life in SU are going to get a lot more heated and a lot more interesting, just because… there are significant numbers of people from both sides in SU. So I think that’s going to be really interesting to watch play out, even if it doesn’t necessarily mean that SU is going to become a pro-Greek Life organization.
VH (6:34-6:51): Editor’s Note will be back next seme ster to break down developing stories in the spring. Head to studlife.com to check out more of our recent coverage, like the fate of next spring’s study abroad programs , a look into campus consumerism and changes to WUPD’s off-campus presence . For Student Life Media, I’m Victoria Hirsh. 
See other recent episodes of Editor’s Note, Student Life’s weekly podcast:
Editor’s Note season 2 episode 9: The people of WashU
Editor’s Note season 2 episode 8: Mental health crisis response deal falls through
Editor’s Note season 2 episode 7: Student dance groups need more space
 ”

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WUDT comes back to the stage with ‘Return’
by Student Life
Jan 01, 2022
“Washington University Dance Theatre dancers perform “Serenity” in 2019. (Photo by Grace Bruton / Student Life)
The curtain rises on a dark stage. Five dancers stand highlighted in blue spotlights and begin to move slowly. The piece, “Edgings,” choreographed by Christine Knoblauch-O’Neal, begins the otherworldly experience of Washington University Dance Theatre (WUDT). 
WUDT titled this year’s performance “Return” in honor of their return to the in-person space of the Edison Theatre, but sitting in the audience, I could not tell that they had ever been gone. The Friday night performance was packed, with the seats almost completely full, and the audience enraptured by every movement.
“Edgings” managed to be both regal and frantic, with purposeful breaks in the synchronicity of the dancers’ movements — such as one dancer racing across the stage whilst the others look on — that suggest the edges of purposeful consciousness. Sometimes, all dancers laid on their backs on the stage, moving their legs in the air like a rotated conga line. At several points I felt distinctly as though I was watching a narrative, but could never quite understand what that narrative was. This created another example of the edge (this time, of meaning). Even the bow at the dance’s end was a carefully choreographed spectacle, suggesting a grander purpose while I remained unable to perceive it. 
The following piece, too, carried “Edgings”’ regal energy while imbuing what I took to be a clear theme. David Marchant choreographed the almost 16-minute “Winter Song,” a piece in which I was so enraptured, I failed to notice the time pass. In it, a crowd of ethereal figures take the stage, moving slowly in a deliberate almost-synchronicity reminiscent of leaves in the wind. “Winter Song” is divided into distinct sections. In the first, the dancers appear almost unaware of their bodies, even existence. The second takes on a more human shape, with eight of the dancers standing on the edges of a rectangle of white light holding dark umbrellas as the final two contort, interacting in ways that could be supporting the other dancer or trying to tug them down. It is somber, funereal.
The group comes together in the third section, moving as part of a larger whole. They kneel, laying their hands on the ground in supplication, before moving to a line in which they flail their arms almost wildly. I found myself strangely reminded of an octopus, arms reaching out from a central whole in a search for… something. That something may be God, or connectivity and meaning more generally, as the dancers crowd around the edges of a steadily-shrinking spotlight, barely keeping their hands in it until they hold the light aloft in their palms before a cut to black. 
Guest choreographer Heather Beal’s “I Want Some Sugar in my Bowl” provided the transition between the first two dances’ somber tones and the final acts’ high energy. The piece began with dancers walking across a dark stage, bringing candles to a memorial. Each said a name as they placed their candle, but the size of the theater rendered the words unintelligible. Only the first few seconds of the piece retain this melancholy; as the first three dancers stand up from the candles they have placed across the stage, Nina Simone’s powerful “Feeling Good” kicks in and the lights switch from blue to red. “Powerful” indeed describes the entire dance. Fists in the air at the song’s cry “Freedom,” the dancers confidently moved across the stage, a joyful and defiant celebration of life in the face of the losses that came before. 
That same energy filled “Stepping Good,” Anthony Redd Williams’ short piece to the song of the same name. The stage was nearly full, lights and crowd reminiscent of a club or dance crew, and energy high enough to get the audience to tap their foot along with the beat. Even after leaving the theater into the cold night, I found myself humming along to “Stepping Good.” 
Between those two pieces came perhaps the most abstract dance of the night, “Not all these things are true,” choreographed by Elinor Harrison. Partly interactive, the audience scanned a QR code and answered questions at certain points of the show while dancers moved before the projector screen, their choreography complimenting the audience answers, which occasionally overshadowed them. The massive, and steadily growing, word “GAY” onscreen in response to the second question, “A dream I tell myself is…” drew most attention away from the performers. At other points, one dancer would separate from the others and speak to the audience, telling anonymous fun facts about the other dancers or narrating a story of a childhood encounter with a deer. The piece ended with one dancer singing a haunting Spanish song and playing the piano as the others migrated from the stage to gather around and watch her. 
Undeniably, the dance spoke to friendship and the formation of community, knowing people and yourself deeper than the surface and the process by which that familiarity forms. But the dance often confused me, with choreography I felt I was missing the point of and a structure that fooled me into thinking the piece was over multiple times before its true end. The combination of various different dance and music styles, too, may have mimicked the variety of life but also felt somewhat disjointed, leaving me confused. 
Sometimes, that confusion is the point. I remain unsure whether “Not all these things are true” conveyed what it was meant to, but it certainly stuck in my head. I too remain surprised that it was the only piece to incorporate digital elements, after the success of last year’s entirely virtual shows, both WUDT and MFA Dance, that successfully used the medium to their advantage. But that may be why this year’s show was titled “Return” – a return not only to in-person performance but its practices.”

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Letter to the Editor: Democrats need a new change in direction
by The Tartan
Jan 01, 2022
“ | 
Sep 30, 2018
I seem to find myself in the minority in today's Democratic Party.
I disagree with the tendency of most Democrats (including political candidates for Congress and those in the news media) to constantly bash Donald Trump over his obnoxious personality and his divisive comments.
As very-conservative "Morning Joe" Scarborough has said on his MSNBC show, when Democrats talk negatively about Trump it just makes his supporters angrier and more protective of him, while corroborating their paranoid belief that the Democrats and the liberal part of the media are out to get Trump. Rather, as Joe suggests, Democrats need to focus on communicating their values and telling the people how the federal government can be a force for good and can make life better for all Americans.
They don't seem to realize that most Americans agree with them that we need to protect the safety-net programs such as Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, Food Stamps, College Student Loans, and Unemployment Ins...
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SDS protests military contractors recruiting CMU students at the TOC
by The Tartan
Jan 01, 2022
“By Adam Tunnard
 | 
Sep 30, 2018
The College of Engineering Technical Opportunities Conference (TOC), hosted in the Wiegand Gymnasium and Rangos Ballroom this past week, was teeming with both anxiety and excitement as employers met with potential employees from across campus disciplines. For some, it was not just an opportunity “to make connections for both full-time and summer employment,” as the official event website states, but rather a showcase of the military-industrial complex.
Carnegie Mellon’s Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) protested the conference on Monday, Sept. 24, for the reason that “some of the attending institutions are, simply put, bad for humanity,” as explained in the flyer they handed out to attendees.
The SDS protest took place outside of the conference by the Black Chairs in the Cohon Center, with around 10 members distributing flyers and talking with attendees, representatives, and the organizers of the event. There were three speakers from SDS who stood on a table in the midd...
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Student Government Column
by The Tartan
Jan 01, 2022
“By
 | 
Sep 30, 2018
Hello from the Student Government Cabinet! We’ll be providing updates here in The Tartan at the end of each month to let you know what the Cabinet is doing to make your Carnegie Mellon experience enriching, meaningful, and inclusive. This week, we wanted to let you know a bit more about who we are and what our goals are for this year.
Our Student Body President and Vice President are Roshni Mehta and Tyler Davis, respectively, who have both been hard at work bringing the visions of their platform to life. With a sustained focus on advocacy for underrepresented groups, diversity of thought and background, and preparation for students’ post-graduation years, Roshni and Tyler are completely committed to addressing and anticipating your needs and concerns.
Each chair on the Cabinet is in charge of a specific facet of campus life. Sophomore Christina Li is our Health & Wellness Chair, and is dedicated to raising awareness of mental and emotional health by improving resources availa...
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Crime and Incident
by The Tartan
Jan 01, 2022
“By Nora Mattson
 | 
Sep 30, 2018
9/22/18-9/28/18
Alcohol Amnesty
Two Carnegie Mellon students were provided medical attention after University Police followed up on reports of intoxicated students at Mudge House and the Greek Quad. No citations were issued due to Alcohol Amnesty.
Open Lewdness
A University of Pittsburgh student reported to University Police that an unknown male was masturbating in public outside of Webster Hall on North Dithridge Street.
Underage Drinking
University Police responded to the intersection of Fifth Avenue and Devonshire Road following reports of an intoxicated male. A Carnegie Mellon student was provided with medical attention and issued a citation for underage drinking.
Defiant Tresspass
A non-affiliate was escorted from Newell Simon Hall by University Police and issued a defiant trespass warning.
Retail Theft
A man unlawfully took a sandwich without paying at the Tepper Quad. University Police responded, and an investigation is ongoing.
*...
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Letter to the Editor: Activism needs to focus on more meaningful topics
by The Tartan
Jan 01, 2022
“ | 
Sep 30, 2018
In regards to her column "Making Spanish gender-neutral friendly," I suggest perhaps Ms. Taipe take one of the many linguistics courses offered at the university, because it is a nonsensical desire to "reform" a language as Ms. Taipe describes, saying "we need to realize that gender neutrality needs to apply to the rest of the gender-natured language (e.g. bello versus bella )." Grammatical gender is an entirely different concept from human gender and is found in numerous languages. Whether an apple (the feminine la manzana in Spanish) is "masculine" or "feminine" has no meaning, and those two categories could easily be labeled something else. Activism should be focused on meaningful issues and not trying to change the structure of languages for futile purposes.
The author is a current student who wishes to remain anonymous.
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Letter to the Editor: Dr. Christine Ford deserved to be heard earlier
by The Tartan
Jan 01, 2022
“ | 
Sep 30, 2018
I decline to speculate on events that may or may not have happened 30 years ago. It is entirely possible that whatever happened at the time was so traumatizing to Dr. Christine Blasey Ford, the clinical psychology professor at Palo Alto University, is that she couldn’t mention anything until a therapy session in 2012. Perhaps the nomination of U.S. Circuit Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court convinced her to take steps to make her story public, even if she had wanted to stay anonymous at the time.
None of these excuse the lack of due diligence exercised by Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) upon receiving Ford’s allegations against Kavanaugh in July. Not once did Feinstein attempt to confront Kavanaugh about the allegations during any private meeting with him or during any of the confirmation hearings.
By eschewing consideration for both the accuser and the accused, Feinstein demonstrated not a single ounce of genuine empathy for Ford. Instead, she wielded the accusation a...
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Former Congressmen come to CIRP's Policy forum to talk bipartisanship in the modern era
by The Tartan
Jan 01, 2022
“By Evangeline Liu
 | 
Sep 30, 2018
This past week, former Congressmen Rep. David Skaggs (D-CO) and Rep. Donald Manzullo (R-IL) visited Carnegie Mellon as part of the “Congress to Campus” program to promote bipartisanship and to get young people interested in public service.
The former congressmen gave a lecture titled “Closing our Political Divide: A Bipartisan Approach to Legislation” on Sept. 27 and sat down for an interview with The Tartan. In the interview, they discussed the value of bipartisanship in politics, the importance of public service and voting, their opinions on the president’s conduct, and their take on the single headline that has dominated political news for days — the hearings for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.
Skaggs’ work promoting bipartisanship goes back two decades, around the time when he says modern hyper-partisanship started influencing national politics. He created the House Bipartisanship Retreats, which went on for eight years, in order to give Republican and Democratic re...
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• Choose a Path, Not a Major
• The Scoop on State Schools
• The Purpose of a Higher Education
• The Importance of Choosing the Right College Major (2012)
• How to choose a college major
• How to guarantee your acceptance to many colleges
• Nailing the College Application Process
• What to do for a Successful Interview
• I Don't Know Where to Start (General College Advice)
• Attitude and Dress Code for an Interview (General College Advice)
• Starting College (General College Advice)
• Boston Apartment lease: Watch out!
• What college is right for you?